Posted 06/04/12

The boy who loved ANTIQUES

"While my childhood friends were engrossed in Boys' Life, Mad Magazine, and racier fare, I eagerly anticipated next month's issue."

Posted 05/09/12

At home in modernism: The John C. Waddell collection of American design

The art of today must be created today," the designer and author Paul T. Frankl wrote in 1928. "It must express the life about us. It must reflect the main characteristics and earmarks of our own complex civilization."1 Over the past four decades, collector John C. Waddell has explored the idea behind Frankl's words.  

Posted 05/09/12

The Kaufman Collection: The pursuit of excellence and a gift to the nation

In my catalogue of friends, mentors, scholars, and collectors, Linda Ha. and the late George M. Kaufman fill all the roles...

Posted 05/09/12

Genius is always above its age

A traveling retrospective of George Bellows offers a fresh perspective on an artist whose work transcended time, place, and the accomplishments of his contemporaries.

Posted 04/11/12

Sewn not hooked

About the same time I bought Mercy Huntting's rug at auction in 2007 (facing page, top), I was given a full run of The Magazine ANTIQUES. Before shelving them for reference I paged through every issue, and to my surprise, found the rug illustrated in May 1951, in Florence Peto's article "Some Early American Crewelwork"; she stated that the rug had been made by Mercy Huntting, who attended Mrs. Lyman Beecher's School in East Hampton, New York. As most rugs are relatively anonymous, this was a spec¬tacular rediscovery and started me on the quest to understand sewn rugs in their appropriate context and to dispel longstanding myths that they were essentially folk art or the products of home craft like hooked rugs, with which they are often confused.

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