Articles

Posted 05/22/15

George E. Ohr

In 1893, in the small town of Biloxi, Mississippi, George E. Ohr's Biloxi Art Pottery burned down. In common with all calamities of this kind it must have caused considerable disruption and financial distress to the victim, but a propitious effect was to ignite a smoldering radicalism in Ohr, who thereafter began to produce some of the most inventive pottery of modern times

Posted 04/27/15

Catesby—Man of Many Talents

This article was originally published in the April 1952 issue of ANTIQUES. A full century before John James Audubon published his Birds of America, an Englishman, Mark Catesby, brought out two folio volumes of what he grandly named Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands....This is probably the first history of any importance ever done of American flora and fauna

Posted 04/27/15

Making friends with fraktur: Some thoughts on the exhibition Drawn with Spirit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

If you are fraktur ignorant, fraktur agnostic, or fraktur allergic, this is an exhibition that should win you over. From its opening moment where a huge curving wall enlarges a small 1834-1835 gem of Adam and Eve attributed to Samuel Gottschall, the visitor is primed for seduction

Posted 04/27/15

The allure of Leeds House: An unparalleled private collection finds its ideal home in Philadelphia

Last winter, one of America's great private collections slipped quietly from its urban home of nearly two decades in upper Manhattan to the splendor of a historic estate in Philadelphia

Posted 04/21/15

Current and coming: Horace Pippin in Chadds Ford

Although his reputation as an artist of consequence has never faltered, Horace Pippin, who was widely exhibited in the 1940s when he was championed by Albert Barnes among other luminaries, has not had a major exhibition in more than two decades

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Where to Go in Summer 2015: A Must-Read Guide for Artistic Summer Destinations i