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The Schwarz Gallery

April 1, 2016  |  by Gregory Cerio

The Private Office of George William Childs at the Philadelphia Public Ledger, Philadelphia by George Bacon Wood Jr. (1832–1910), 1877. Oil on canvas, 27 by 38 inches. Private collection; all photographs courtesy of the Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia.

 

 

Specializing in American and European paintings of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries and best known for its expertise in Philadelphia artists, the Schwarz Gallery on Chestnut Street is one of the city’s most esteemed art galleries. The success of the family-owned and family-run firm is all the more remarkable for the fact that its history has been so marked by contingency. Consider, for example, that not one of the members of the three generations of Schwarzes to operate the gallery actually planned to become a dealer. “My grandfather Frank Schwarz, who founded the company, had been studying to be a lawyer; and my dad was a pre-med student,” says Robert D. Schwarz Jr., who manages the gallery wit…» More

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The Market | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Mount Vernon Comes to Freeman's

March 9, 2016  |  Despite its dainty name the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association is not an outfit to be trifled with. Nor is it one to do anything by half measures. Founded in 1858, it is comprised of twenty-seven members, each representing a state in the union at that time, who approached and still approach the project of preserving George Washington’s estate with an almost military rigor. Mount Vernon was virtually empty when the association was formed; the members set about furnishing it by having the representative from each state adopt a room. In 1858 these representatives were the wives and daughters of powerful politicians, jurists, and cultural figures, and thus well positioned to locate and donate important objects. Alice Mary Longfellow, for instance, daughter of the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, located George Washington’s desk and brought it back to the estate, where it remains today. 

Mount Vernon Ladies Association Council of 1884. All photographs courtesy of the Mount …

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

The Fabric Workshop and Museum

March 8, 2016  |  At the moment, Philadelphia’s Fabric Workshop and Museum has a national reputation though it is less well known around town. In one respect it is a little like its founder, the late Marion “Kippy” Boulton Stroud, who was both bold (and bossy) but surprisingly self-effacing. Unlike the Rosenbach or the Barnes, to name two of the city’s other idiosyncratic museums, FWM is something of a high-wire act, an ongoing experiment in the very definition of what this institution is and can be.

 

That openness should help FWM survive the demise of Kippy Stroud. You see it everywhere, starting at the classy gift shop near the entrance, where Tracey Blackman, the shop’s director, draws you into conversation while dispatching employees to do repairs, checking on meetings, and describing the shop’s artist-designed ties, napkins, hand-bags, and ceramics. You get the sense that she might even hondle with you if you couldn’t come up with the necessary cash. Tracey is improvising. Ever…

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter

March 8, 2016  |  

The American Revolution has a hit on its hands with Hamilton, the hip-hop musical currently lighting up Broadway. “Who lives, who dies, who tells your story,” the cast sings in its sly retooling of our republic as the story of Alexander Hamilton’s rise through the imperial city of New York (“History is happening in Manhattan and we just happen/to be in the greatest city in the world...”).

But wait. Wasn’t Philadelphia the cradle of liberty and our first capital? Wasn’t it in Philadelphia that Hamilton orchestrated the consolidation of federal power, and was it not, moreover, Philadelphia where his busy libido came to grief and scandal? Yes, but... Hamilton loved New York and lobbied hard for it as the temporary capital; Philadelphia was his third or fourth or fifth choice, so I guess you can say that at this late date he finally got his way. He usually did.

So we will stand up for the lesser-known glories of Philadelphia in this issue (timed in part to its April antiques sh…» More

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Current & Coming | By Eleanor H. Gustafson

End Notes: Happy to be here, our new home near Madison Square Park

February 10, 2016  |  Last October The Magazine ANTIQUES and our sister publications MODERN and Art in America joined forces with the venerable ARTnews. In November we moved from SoHo, our longtime home, to new offices just down from Madison Square Park and within sight of the Flatiron Building, built in 1902, the year ARTnews began publication.

By Eleanor H. Gustafson

The Flatiron Building, designed by Daniel Burnham (1846–1912), completed 1902, in a photograph of c. 1905 by the Detroit Publishing Company. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Prints and Photographs Division.  

 

 

 

 

 

It’s a neighborhood that is currently food central for New York gastronomes and casual grazers. Bookended by the high end Eleven Madison Park on one side of the park and the mecca of Eataly on the other, there is the humble Shake Shack at the park’s core, where you can eat al fresco and look at some fine sculpture and architecture. For us this neighborhood constitutes the ideal conjunction of food and ar…» More

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by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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