Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

George Caleb Bingham at the Amon Carter Museum

October 31, 2014  |  When Virginia-born George Caleb Bingham was seven, his father lost most of the family's fortune, and they moved to Missouri to build a new life, settling first in Franklin, on the banks of the Missouri River, and later on a farm in Saline County. Who knows what would have caught his imagination had Bingham stayed in Virginia, but there is no question that life on and near the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers as the nation moved westward brought him lasting fame as a painter, providing him with subject matter that satisfied both his artistic aims and his belief in de­mocracy. For the first time, Bingham's river pictures are being examined in depth in an exhibition organized by the Saint Louis Art Museum and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas, where it opens on October 2.

Above:  The Wood-Boat by George Caleb Bingham 91811 - 1879), 1850.  Saint Louis Art Museum. 

At a time when images of the West proliferated--in paintings, prints, maps, magazine illustr…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Schoolgirl needlework at the Morven Museum

October 31, 2014  |  This year marks the 350th anniversary of NewJersey, a milestone celebrated across the state with events and pro­grams highlighting innova­tion, diversity, and liberty. The Morven Museum and Garden in Princeton is marking the occa­sion with an exhibition that in­troduces all three themes. Hail Specimen of Female Art! New Jersey Schoolgirl Needlework, 1726-1860 brings together 150 examples of needlework made in or by New Jersey schoolgirls and organizes them geograph­ically to illustrate connections between the elaborate artworks and utilitarian objects crafted by girls of diverse religious, family, and socioeconomic backgrounds, from the Quaker schools in Burlington County to a luxurious silk-on-silk memorial to George Washington made at the prestigious Folwell School in Philadelphia by a New Jersey native.

Above: Needlework by Kiziah Sharp, Burlington County, New Jersey, 1825. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Diker.

Research for the show has made it pos­sible to exhibit mul…» More

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Current & Coming | By Katy Kiick

Events: Exhibitions, symposiums, and lectures through December

October 30, 2014  |  

ALABAMA

Montgomery Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts: "Alexander Archipenko: Dreizehn Steinzichnun­gen"; November 29 to January 18, 2015. "The Grand Tour: Prints from Rome, Florence, Venice, Paris, and London"; to November 23. "Imprint­ing the West: Manifest Destiny, Real and Imag­ined"; November 8 to January 4, 2015.

ARIZONA

Tucson Tucson Museum of Art: "La Vida Fantas­tica: Selections from the Latin American Folk Art Collection"; to June 30, 2015.

ARKANSAS

Bentonville Crystal Bridges Museum of Amer­ican Art: "Born of Fire: Ceramic Art from Re­gional Collections"; to March 2, 2015. "John James Audubon and the Artist as Naturalist"; to January 5, 2015.

CALIFORNIA

LosAngeles Autry National Center: "Floral Journey: Native North American Beadwork"; to April 26, 2015.* "Route 66: The Road and the Romance"; to January 4, 2015.

J. Paul Getty Center: "Drawing in the Age of Rubens"; to January 11, 2015. "World War I: War of Images, Images of War"; November 18 to April 19, 20…» More

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Current & Coming | By Cynthia Drayton

A Century of Mourning Attire at the Met

October 27, 2014  |  Death Becomes Her, the Costume Institute's first fall exhibition in eight years, examines American and English bereavement rituals of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Period fashions and accessories, including hats, shawls, parasols, and jewelry, along with fashion plates, satirical illustrations, and mourning pictures reveal the formal rituals of bereavement, mostly observed by women. A woman's selection of mourning clothing demonstrated her status, taste, and level of propriety. Quotes from period publications flashed along the walls of the exhibit's main gallery demonstrate the range of attitudes by and towards women and their observation of mourning, which includes the social activist Julia Ward Howe's frustration at the inconvenience of spending money on black clothes, to etiquette manual author Robert de Valcourt's description of veiled widows as alluring and seductive.

The thirty ensembles are organized chronologically and show the progression of appropri…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Egon Schiele at the Neue Galerie

October 15, 2014  |  What Egon Schiele would have achieved had he lived beyond his twenty-eighth year is a matter to keep art historians up at night. When he died of Spanish influenza in 1918 he had already accomplished an astonishing amount: some three thousand drawings as well as paintings and sculpture of sufficient merit to position him as the heir to the late Gustav Klimt as Vienna's preeminent artist. Whether Schiele would have mellowed into a grand establishment presence or continued as Vienna's delinquent wild child is open to question-and there is certainly evidence to support both suppositions.

AboveSelf-portrait with Peacock Waistcoat, Standing by Egon Schiele (1890-1918), 1911. Collection of Ernst Ploil.

In 2005 the Neue Galerie staged a rich exhibition of Schiele's nudes that suggested, in its inevitable focus on his obsessive eroticism, the latter course, while its new exhibition of the artist's portraits gives us a slightly more mellow Schiele, at least in his late portraits such…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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The New York Ceramics Fair
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Spencer Marks, Ltd
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CL Prickett
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