Current & Coming | By Carolin C. Young

Farther afield: TEFAF, BADA, and the Salon du Dessin

February 9, 2015  |  Europe puts its best foot forward to welcome the massive influx of international collectors and dealers who head there each spring.  The European Fine Art Fair (TEFAF) Maastricht attracts the largest crowds and most attention but The British Antiques Dealers’ Association (BADA) annual fair in london and Paris's tailored Salon du Dessin, both of which follow closely on TEFAF’s heels, vie to attract visitors who have made the journey.

MAASTRICHT:

TEFAF -- The 28th edition of The European Fine Art (TEFAF) Maastricht, which opens March 13th, marks the highlight of the international fair calendar and will feature 274 dealers at the top of their respective fields.  Over 74,000 people attended last year and numbers can be expected to be at least as hefty this time around.  What makes the event so popular with exhibitors as well as visitors is its organizers’ ability to maintain high standards of quality and a very personalized level of service in spite of its massive scale. 

It has…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Talking antiques: Winter Antiques Show

January 20, 2015  |  We asked exhibitors at the Winter Antiques Show to highlight one exceptional object in their booths and describe it as they might to an interested collector. Here are the things they chose, along with some of their comments.

 

ALLAN AND PENNY KATZ

This artful rendering of a birdcage in the shape of the United States Capitol Building was undoubtedly made as a Centennial celebration piece in 1876. It retains its original patriotic colors and was created by our favorite artist, Anonymous. 

 

ARONSON ANTIQUAIRS

Robert Aronson recently discovered an exceptional, large (approximately 16 ½ inches tall) Delft bouquetière in the shape of an elegantly dressed gentleman that appears to match a figure of Mary II, or Mary Stuart, that he had previously acquired. Mary and William of Orange ruled Holland and England during the Glorious Revolution from 1689 until her death in 1694. The figures are attributed to the Greek A Factory, from which the royal couple ordered many important Delft…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

The Scene, January/February 2015

January 20, 2015  |  In anticipation of this year’s Winter Antiques Show loan exhibition, Ahead of the Curve: The Newark Museum 1909–2015, students from East Side House Settlement—the Winter Antiques Show’s beneficiary since the show started in 1954—toured the museum.

   

 

 

 

Students at the Newark Museum's Ballantine House. Photo by Jay Savulich. 

The Winter Antiques show is known for its sophisticated lending exhibitions, festive opening-night party, large and varied roster of dealers, and rigorous vetting process, but sixty-one years ago it began modestly as a small booth in another show. A board member from the East Side House Settlement, a supplementary education resource center in Yorkville on the Upper East Side, had inherited several trunks of Parisian couture and, along with some of her fellow board members, took a booth at the 1954 National Antiques Show at Madison Square Garden, where they raised $1,700 for East Side House. Just one year later the board secured the Seventh Regime…» More

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Current & Coming | By Carolin C. Young

Farther afield: London’s leather alchemist: Gavin Rookledge, Rooks Books

January 12, 2015  |  Rooks Books produces books (and other leather-wrapped objects) that have a tactile, physical pres­ence while exuding a sense of otherworldly mystery. One might expect to find such volumes in the hands of Gandalf or on the walls of the library at Hogwarts. Each uniquely created binding, made from a vast variety of leathers and other natural skins, seems to say, “touch me, I hold the secrets of the universe.” And yet each commands enough respect to elicit a pause before leafing through the vellum pages, lest one be turned to dust for laying eyes on such knowledge without the proper initiation.

      

Photographs by Debbie Patterson.

These books are, in fact, not made by elves but are cre­ated today in south London by Gavin Rookledge and a team of experts trained in traditional techniques of bookbinding and printing. Some even contain secret compartments that can hide incongruously contempo­rary iPads for living wizards.

Rookledge, when lecturing to art students, defines the …» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's letter, January/February 2015

January 12, 2015  |  When he was designing the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth the great American architect Louis Kahn said that he wanted it to resemble “a friendly home.” That might surprise anyone familiar with Kahn’s museums—the Kimbell, the Yale Center for British Art, or the Yale University Art Gallery—but I think he was simply saying that he wanted his building to wall out cultural intimidation. What he, or any museum these days, might want to wall in is another story.

At the newly reopened Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum—described in these pages by Frank Rose, who is always on the cutting edge of everything—they want visitors to come in and create their own twenty-first-century design experience. At Harvard where the art museums have also just reopened after six years, Ethan Lasser says they want visitors to listen in as the masterpieces talk to each other across continents and centuries, and they have arranged them to do just that.

And then there is the Newark Museum, subjec…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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Roberto Freitas
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Gary R. Sullivan Antiques Inc.
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Jonathon Boos, LLC
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