From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

A Bronx Tale: Exhibitors from the Winter Antiques Show tour East Side House Settlement, the show’s beneficiary

February 10, 2016  |   

East Side House Settlement (ESHS) Administrative Building, 337 Alexander Avenue,  in the Mott Haven  section of the Bronx, New York. Photographs by Ahron Foster. 

 

 

“Take the work that you love, whatever it is, and angle it towards justice.”               -Ta-Nehisi Coates 

September 29, 2015: On this beautiful Indian summer day two quite different communities came together for a few hours in the South Bronx: a group of exhibitors at January’s Winter Antiques Show boarded a van bound for the Mott Haven neighborhood to visit the folks at East Side House Settlement, the charity that established the Winter show some sixty years ago.

Back then, in 1955, ESHS was still located on the city’s Upper East Side, near enough to the show’s site in Manhattan to make the connection between programs for the disadvantaged and the buying and selling of Queen Anne high chests and antique diamond brooches slightly less remote.

In 1963 ESHS moved to the South Bronx, a world away from …» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter, January/February 2016

January 14, 2016  |  We occasionally split the run of an issue of ANTIQUES with one cover for subscribers—an interior from Abbeville, Louisiana, in this case—and another for distribution at shows—Louis Lozowick’s 1930 lithograph of the Brooklyn Bridge. If this sounds like a North/South thing it isn’t exactly, but I’ll explain that in a moment.

The New York art and antiques season seems a good time to consider the Brooklyn Bridge, a potent symbol linking past and future, our perennial theme here. Its soaring Gothic arches held in the disciplined embrace of an engineering marvel have always beckoned artists, poets, filmmakers, and musicians, and I can’t be the only Midwestern adolescent who read Hart Crane’s The Bridge and fell in love with those cables and arches before ever visiting this city. Did I imagine a monument so powerful that, in Crane’s overwrought words, it could “lend a myth to God”?  I did. I still see it as a work of art, capable, on any given day, of transfiguring the landscape and …» More

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Current & Coming | By Archived articles

On Books: New and Noteworthy

December 18, 2015  |  

Making It Modern: The Folk Art Collection of Elie and Viola Nadelman by Margaret K. Hofer and Roberta J. M. Olson (New-York Historical Society in association with D. Giles). 376 pp., color and b/w illus. 

There’s nowt so queer as folk,” according to the venerable English comment on the vagaries of human personality. Indeed, when the Polish-born American sculptor Elie Nadelman and his wife Viola Flannery married in 1919, the exceptional variety of objects that we now categorize as folk art were only beginning to be recognized as worthy of serious collecting in America.

Though the Nadelmans referred to their ac quisitions as “folk art” from the beginning of their collecting activities in 1920, the term itself didn’t enter widespread use until the next decade.

The Nadlemans had considerable money to spend because Viola had been left a sizeable estate by her first husband, and they started their collection by purchasing objects to furnish their houses. Among their first signif…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Archived articles

Editor's Letter, November/December 2015

December 7, 2015  |  It would be tempting to wiggle into this one, introduce the issue with some high minded talk about the past not being another country and so forth, go on to mention our wonderful articles about Julia Margaret Cameron, etc., but more about all of that in a minute…The fact is we have something here requiring immediate comment—Paul Kossey’s discovery of a set of drawings done in 1945 quite probably by Schenley High School in Pittsburgh’s most famous graduate, Andy Warhol. Let’s begin with Mr. Kossey, whose sleuthing has appeared in these pages before (“George Caleb Bingham’s Rocky Mountains, a landscape discovery,” November/December 2014). He could have gone elsewhere with his big find but he trusts us to see something like this through in a careful manner. And I think we have.

This is hot. Or it’s not. Some people will take a shot at it. The experts consulted have been encouraging, but no one will risk authenticating any work by Warhol now for all the well-publicized legal reaso…» More

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Current & Coming | By Archived articles

Art Brut in New York

December 4, 2015  |  Although the American Folk Art Museum’s exhibition space has contracted since it moved to 2 Lincoln Square from the now-demolished Tod Williams and Billie Tsien building on West Fifty-Third Street, it continues to expand thematically. Following its recent exhibition of self-taught performance artists, When the Curtain Never Comes Down, which stretched from Japan to Brazil, the museum is now mounting Art Brut in America: The Incursion of Jean Dubuffet. The two hundred works are drawn from Dubuffet’s vast collection in the Collection de l’Art Brut in Lausanne, Switzerland. The exhibition is in some ways a reprise of a ten-year-long display of twelve hundred works from his collection that was held in the East Hampton, Long Island, home of the artist Alfonso Ossorio between 1952 and 1962. This time around the works brought here will have a public venue, and what visitors will see amounts to a staging of Dubuffet’s great moment of impact on American art and artists. That some of the…» More

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Where to Go in Summer 2015: A Must-Read Guide for Artistic Summer Destinations i

[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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Philip H. Bradley Co.
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Suzanne Courcier & Robert W. Wilkins
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The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center
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