From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter

July 11, 2016  |  

It has been something of a long goodbye, my planned departure from these pages, and yet it has taken all of five months to arrive at the right successor. Now we have—Gregory Cerio, an old friend as it happens, whom you will meet on the last page of this issue. We are all pleased. We know Greg as someone with an unyielding faith in the arts of the past and a keen sense of how to give them a lively presence today. 

And so to this, my last outing as editor of ANTIQUES and our annual (mostly) folk art issue, always a favorite of mine. When I started here in February of 2008 I was looking for ways to inject some joy into that sour era of financial collapse and cultural dismay. Folk and outsider art certainly showed me one inviting avenue. I have come to value the way they have liberated art history, opening it to everyday life, relaxing our approach to the sublime in museums, private collections, and especially in this magazine. Pop art did something of the same thing, but folk a…» More

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Current & Coming | By Archived articles

V&A: The Victoria and Albert’s new look at Europe 1600–1815

June 1, 2016  |  By Joan DeJean

Neptune and Triton  by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, c. 1622– 1623, as installed in the newly reopened Europe 1600–1815 galleries at the V&A. Except as noted, all images © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

 

 

 

In December 2015 the Victoria and Albert Museum’s European galleries were opened to the public for the first time in nearly a decade. The prime space just off the museum’s grand entrance has been completely redesigned to uncover the original 1909 architecture of Aston Webb, and more than eleven hundred objects from the museum’s remarkable collections of art and design are now on display. Visitors descend stairs and immediately experience the power of the Italian baroque: Bernini’s monumental sculpture Neptune and Triton of about 1622–1623 dominates the first gallery.

The central rooms of the galleries known as Europe 1600–1815 introduce periods and styles in chronological order: the baroque with rich purple walls, pistachio green for the rococo, and …» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter, May/June 2016

May 16, 2016  |  Glenn Adamson joins us this month as editor at large with an interesting mandate you can read about below. Glenn was most recently director of the Museum of Arts and Design. Before that he was head of research at the V&A, and curator of the Chipstone Foundation.

The Magazine ANTIQUES: In your column you will think through difficult matters that confront the arts just now, beginning with the problem of ivory. What other issues might interest you?

Glenn Adamson: What interests me most about the column is its timeliness. My plan is to keep an eye on the morning paper, and see what objects from the past come to mind. Right now the refugee issue feels urgent, as does the Black Lives Matter campaign. So those may inspire my next two columns. But I’m also keeping an open mind. 

TMA: Is the column meant to be political?

GA: Yes, but not in a partisan sense. My goal is to find a middle way through the oppositional politics of our time. Historical artifacts are multi valent, textur…» More

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Current & Coming | By Elizabeth Pochoda

The Yale Center for British Art Reopens

May 11, 2016  |  

The Library Court of the Yale Center for British Art, following its recent reinstallation. Photograph by Richard Caspole.  

 

Traditional architecture can age gracefully but nothing is more dispiriting than modernism gone to seed. That may be especially true of Louis Kahn’s work because Kahn hid nothing; it was part of his bravery, and his ethics, to put every trick and technique on view, exposing it all with as much light as his walls could contain. If you revere his architecture as I do, you want the fit and finish of his final building, the Yale Center for British Art, which reopens on May 11 after an elaborate conservation project, to live up to the architect’s exceptional honesty by giving you his bravery unfiltered, undiluted, and with all of the serene thrills of 1977. And so it has.

 

Louis Kahn standing in front of the Yale Center for British Art under construction, in a photograph taken in February 1973. Yale Center for British Art, Institutional Archives.  

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Dealer profile | By Archived articles

The Schwarz Gallery

April 1, 2016  |  by Gregory Cerio

The Private Office of George William Childs at the Philadelphia Public Ledger, Philadelphia by George Bacon Wood Jr. (1832–1910), 1877. Oil on canvas, 27 by 38 inches. Private collection; all photographs courtesy of the Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia.

 

 

Specializing in American and European paintings of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries and best known for its expertise in Philadelphia artists, the Schwarz Gallery on Chestnut Street is one of the city’s most esteemed art galleries. The success of the family-owned and family-run firm is all the more remarkable for the fact that its history has been so marked by contingency. Consider, for example, that not one of the members of the three generations of Schwarzes to operate the gallery actually planned to become a dealer. “My grandfather Frank Schwarz, who founded the company, had been studying to be a lawyer; and my dad was a pre-med student,” says Robert D. Schwarz Jr., who manages the gallery wit…» More

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[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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