The Market | By ANTIQUES Staff

The ADA's 1st online antiques show

March 31, 2014  |  Please go to the web site for the Antique Dealers of America's first online antiques show (adadealers.com), a three day round the clock event that lets you shop in your pajamas, guarantees authenticity, offers stuff exclusive to its venue, provides for buyer's remorse, and eliminates the pre-show wheeling dealing that allows dealers to pick off each other's stuff before you get to see it. To these and all the other inducements on the site we add four of our own:

1.  The online show might just be the step into the 21st century that the venerable organization has needed.

2.  The show's web page is well designed, lively, and convincing, another auspicious sign.

3.  You can buy but not with one click. Once you decide on an item you still have to contact the dealer and schmooze, an irreplaceable part of the charm of buying, selling, and collecting antiques and fine art.

4.  It might just work, and if it does we are betting that by creating an energetic force field around antique…» More

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The Market | By Laura Beach

Seen and Heard

March 19, 2014  |  ART FAIR OVERLOAD?

With the show season in full swing, "collectors are heading into the fray this year with a serious case of art-fair overload," Kelly Crow posits in the Wall Street Journal here and here.

Crow says "at least 200 large fairs now jam the art-world calendar-complete with attendant parties and smaller satellite fairs in tow." Before anyone could actually ponder the consequences of perpetual motion it was time to be off again, from the Art Fair and the Armory Show in New York to the European Fine Art Fair (TEFAF) in Maastricht, The Netherlands, then back to NewYork for Asia Week, all in the space of two weeks in March.

TEFAF STARTS STRONG...

Preliminary reports are in for the European Fine Art Fair, which organizers say attracted over 10,000 private and institutional collectors from around the world for the most successful opening day in its history.  The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired a c. 1690 parcel-gilt ostrich ewer and basin from J. Kugel Antiquaires…» More

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Current & Coming | By Eleanor H. Gustafson

Lost imperial Easter Egg found

March 19, 2014  |  In a story that is the stuff of fairy tales, one of the missing imperial Fabergé Easter Eggs made for the Russian royal family has been found and will be on public view at Court Jewellers Wartski in Mayfair, London, in the run up to Easter. The magnificent Third Imperial Easter Egg had turned up in the hands of an unsuspecting American Midwesterner who bought it for its gold value.

Carl Fabergé, goldsmith to the czars, created the lavish imperial Easter eggs for Emperors Alexander III and Nicholas II from 1885 to 1916. Only fifty were ever made, each one unique. After the revolution the imperial eggs were seized by the Bolsheviks. Some they kept, but most were sold to the West. Two were bought by Queen Mary and are part of the British Royal Collection. Many belong to museums, oligarchs, sheikhs, and heiresses. Eight, however, are missing-of which only three are believed to have survived the revolution.

The rediscovered egg was the one given by Alexander III to his wife, Emp…» More

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Current & Coming | By Eleanor H. Gustafson

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile

March 19, 2014  |  The pan roast is back. The herring is coming. The famous Oyster Bar restaurant in New York's Grand Central Terminal reopened last Thursday after a four-month renovation of its 101-year-old interior, particularly a thorough cleaning of its ceiling of interlocking vaults covered with terracotta tiles by the Guastavino firm.  Seeing the tiles fully cleaned and all the edging light bulbs aglow hints at the wonders in store for visitors to the exhibition Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile, opening at the Museum of the City of New York on March 26.


The Oyster Bar is one of more than two hundred  surviving examples of the marvels of engineering and architectural beauty created throughout the five boroughs by Spanish immigrants Rafael Guastavino Sr. and Jr. in the early twentieth century . Their system of structural tile vaults-lightweight, fireproof, low-maintenance, and capable of supporting significant loads-was used by leading architects of the day, …» More

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The Market | By Eleanor H. Gustafson

End Notes: Photographer Bill Gekas

March 17, 2014  |  We enjoy exploring the ways in which contemporary artists look to the past to inform their work. We are especially intrigued by the photography of Australian Bill Gekas, whose primary inspiration for these images of his daughter is clearly the Dutch old masters. Digital photography is his tool, but his evocative images are also the result of astute bor­rowing and improvisation. To see more of his work, visit billgekas.com.

When did you start photographing, and was your focus always on portraiture?

I've been involved with photography since my early twenties, in the mid-1990s, when I was shooting with film cameras and develop­ing and printing black-and-white film in a makeshift darkroom. During those years I was shooting a bit of everything except portraiture, which didn't interest me until I discovered the great portrait works of Irving Penn, Alfred Stieglitz, and Diane Arbus. They had a haunting beauty that made the viewer connect with the subject. To create the same kind of …» More

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NYG 2013

[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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