The Market | By Archived articles

Delftware from a St. Louis collection

March 1, 1983  |  BY REKA NEILSON FISHER, Curatorial assistant, Saint Louis Art Museum

THE CREAMICS COLLECTION of Mr. and Mrs. George S. Rosborough Jr., of Webster Groves, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis, is mainly devoted to English earthenware of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Initially they collected early nineteenth-century yellow-glazed earthenware, but then they turned to earlier wares, particularly delftware, which attracted them because of the freshness of the decoration, drawn directly on the glaze.

The Rosboroughs' English delftware collection is comprised of all-white, mid-seventeenth-century wares, late seventeenth-century decorated wares primarily made in London and Bristol, and later wares from Bristol, Liverpool, and Dublin. There are also examples of tin-glazed earthenware of exceptional quality from France, Sweden, and Russia.

The Rosboroughs' delftware is distinguished by the collectors' discriminating taste and their sensitive, scholarly approach to collecting.…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Stephen and Maxfield Parrish in New Hamsphire

June 1, 1979  |  Originally publsihed in June 1979

By Virginia Reed Colby

Stephen Parrish, a well-known painter and etcher, and his son Maxfield,1 one of the most popular artists of the early twentieth century, both moved to New Hampshire in the 1890s. Stephen came to Cornish in 1893, following the sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and other artists, writers, and musicians who made up what came to be known as the Cornish colony.2 The members of the colony found rural Cornish a delightful place to work, yet they had easy access to New York City by train from Windsor, Vermont, across the Connecticut River.3

Stephen Parrish's house Northcote4 was designed by Wilson Eyre 91858- 1944), a noted architect from Philadelphia, where Parrish had also lived before coming to Cornish. From 1893 to 1902 Parrish spent his time building the house, a shop, a greenhouse, a stable for his horse Betty, a studio, and the extensive gardens. To take advantage of the view Parrish lined up the main garden path with th…» More

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American folk painting, The Wiltshire collection

September 1, 1978  |  By RICHARD WOODWARD; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September 1978.

Paintings by America's first artists afford an informative and entertaining view of the nation's early years. Many of these painters received academic instruction at home or abroad, while others were either wholly untutored or obtained their training from nonacademic sources. The work of this latter group, the "folk painters," provides an insight into native American culture and artistic talent. These painters have left an abundance of portraits recording the appearance and personalities of their sitters as well as other pictures that provide glimpses of the daily life of our first citizens. The spiritual life of the German-American is reflected in their fraktur (see Pl. IV).

Pl. I. Martha Payne (b. 1773), by the Payne limner, GoochlandCounty, Virginia, c. 1791. Oil on canvas, 43 7/8 by 37 ¾ inches. Martha Payne, the second child of Archer and Martha Dandridge Payne of Goochland County, was descended from seve…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Two hoof spoons

September 1, 1978  |  By ALBERT SCHER; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September 1978.

 When Helen Burr Smith wrote about silver spoons with hoof-shape terminals in ANTIQUES in 1944 there were only four of these interesting survivals from seventeenth-century Dutch New York households known in America. Now two more hoof spoons have come to light.

 

Fig. 1-Silver hoof spoon, probably New York, seventeenth century. Length 6 9/16 inches. Inscribed F-A on the flat of the hoof. It is nearly identical to the spoon shown in Figs. 2, 2a. Private collection; photograph by Meyers Studio.

 

 

 

One bears the initials of the unidentified first owner F-A, in seventeenth-century lettering on the flat of the hoof, but is otherwise unmarked (Figs. 1, 1a). It appears to be identical to a spoon made by Ahasuerus Hendricks (Figs. 2, 2a) that was discussed and illustrated in Miss Smith's article, except that the bowl of the spoon in Figure 1 is slightly larger than that of the Hendricks example. In both cases, the …» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Skippets

July 1, 1978  |  By J. S. BROWN; From The Magazine ANTIQUES, July 1978.

Skippets are small boxes made to hold and protect pendent wax seals attached to important documents. Silver, silver-gilt, and gold examples were used by the United States government between 1815 and 1871, primarily on treaties with other countries that had been ratified by Congress. The skippet was suspended from the treaty by woven strands of gold or silver, often entwined with strands of silk, which had been threaded through the box before the hot wax was poured in. The wax was impressed with the great seal of the United States, and the cover of the box was hand chased with a design based on the seal.

The first skippet made for the United States government was for the Treaty of Ghent, which settled the War of 1812 with England. Now in the Hall of Records in London, it is marked by the Georgetown silversmith Charles A. Burnett. His shop on Bridge Street was not far from the bookshop and bindery of Joseph Milligan, to who…» More

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[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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