From the Archives | By Archived articles

From the archives: "New Mexican tinwork, 1840-1915"

October 1, 1991  |  By Lane Coulter; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, October 1991

The art of the tinsmith flourished in New Mexico from about 1840 to 1915. During this period Hispanic tinsmiths primarily made devotional objects that reflected the Roman Catholicism of the Spanish Southwest, but they also made a limited number of more secular objects. They used shapes derived from architecture as well as immensely fanciful designs of their own invention.

Above:  Frame made by Jose Maria Apodaca (1844 – 1924), c. 1910. H: 15 ½. Inches. Collection of Bob and Cindy Gallegos, and photographs are by Michael Monteaux. 

Tinwork developed in NewMexico as the materials-tin plate, glass, and printed religious images-became available to the craftsmen. Two events brought these materials to New Mexico. First, in the summer of 1846 the American Army of the West marched into Santa Fe and declared New Mexico a territory of the United States, and second, in 1851 the French-born prelate Jean Baptiste Lamy (1814 - 1888…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Patronage and the publication of botanical illustration

August 1, 1989  |   By Bernadette G. Callery; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, August 1989.

Modern collections of botanical illustrations are treaty indebted to the patrons of the past, whose leisured curiosity and horticultural acquisitiveness enabled them to accumulate various "vegetable rarities," and then to have those plants recorded in drawings or paintings from which published illustrations were prepared. Many of the surviving florilegia, or collections of flower illustrations, are records of the contents of specific gardens. many of the illustrators whose work is now collected earned their livelihood by documenting newly discovered or introduced plants nurtured in private gardens. The artist presented the proud owner, and sometimes his friends, with a plant portrait, usually in watercolor, and in some instances these illustrations were collected and published. Prior to publication it was not uncommon for an artist to prepare several copies of a particular illustration for different patrons. 

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

The jewelry of René Lalique

June 1, 1987  |  By GEOFFREY C. MUNN; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, June 1987.

Even if the word genius was used as sparingly as it should be, the late nineteenth- and early twentieth century jeweler René Lalique would always be so described. Rather than a craftsman with a leaning toward the artistic, he was an accomplished artist who chose to express himself primarily in jewelry.

The son of a merchant who dealt in pretty luxury goods called "articles de Paris," Lalique spent an uneventful childhood between school in Paris and holidays in the French countryside. It was undoubtedly there that he learned to see nature as a primary source of inspiration; and recording what he saw in the fields and streams was an easy task for a boy who, by the age of fifteen, was earning a steady income as a portrait miniaturist. His interests coincided perfectly with the revolution in the decorative arts known as art nouveau, which rejected eclecticism for a direct interpretation of the natural world. Europeans wo…» More

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The Market | By Archived articles

Delftware from a St. Louis collection

March 1, 1983  |  BY REKA NEILSON FISHER, Curatorial assistant, Saint Louis Art Museum

THE CREAMICS COLLECTION of Mr. and Mrs. George S. Rosborough Jr., of Webster Groves, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis, is mainly devoted to English earthenware of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Initially they collected early nineteenth-century yellow-glazed earthenware, but then they turned to earlier wares, particularly delftware, which attracted them because of the freshness of the decoration, drawn directly on the glaze.

The Rosboroughs' English delftware collection is comprised of all-white, mid-seventeenth-century wares, late seventeenth-century decorated wares primarily made in London and Bristol, and later wares from Bristol, Liverpool, and Dublin. There are also examples of tin-glazed earthenware of exceptional quality from France, Sweden, and Russia.

The Rosboroughs' delftware is distinguished by the collectors' discriminating taste and their sensitive, scholarly approach to collecting.…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Stephen and Maxfield Parrish in New Hamsphire

June 1, 1979  |  Originally publsihed in June 1979

By Virginia Reed Colby

Stephen Parrish, a well-known painter and etcher, and his son Maxfield,1 one of the most popular artists of the early twentieth century, both moved to New Hampshire in the 1890s. Stephen came to Cornish in 1893, following the sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and other artists, writers, and musicians who made up what came to be known as the Cornish colony.2 The members of the colony found rural Cornish a delightful place to work, yet they had easy access to New York City by train from Windsor, Vermont, across the Connecticut River.3

Stephen Parrish's house Northcote4 was designed by Wilson Eyre 91858- 1944), a noted architect from Philadelphia, where Parrish had also lived before coming to Cornish. From 1893 to 1902 Parrish spent his time building the house, a shop, a greenhouse, a stable for his horse Betty, a studio, and the extensive gardens. To take advantage of the view Parrish lined up the main garden path with th…» More

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