The Market | By Archived articles

American folk painting, The Wiltshire collection

September 1, 1978  |  By RICHARD WOODWARD; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September 1978.

Paintings by America's first artists afford an informative and entertaining view of the nation's early years. Many of these painters received academic instruction at home or abroad, while others were either wholly untutored or obtained their training from nonacademic sources. The work of this latter group, the "folk painters," provides an insight into native American culture and artistic talent. These painters have left an abundance of portraits recording the appearance and personalities of their sitters as well as other pictures that provide glimpses of the daily life of our first citizens. The spiritual life of the German-American is reflected in their fraktur (see Pl. IV).

Pl. I. Martha Payne (b. 1773), by the Payne limner, GoochlandCounty, Virginia, c. 1791. Oil on canvas, 43 7/8 by 37 ¾ inches. Martha Payne, the second child of Archer and Martha Dandridge Payne of Goochland County, was descended from seve…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Two hoof spoons

September 1, 1978  |  By ALBERT SCHER; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September 1978.

 When Helen Burr Smith wrote about silver spoons with hoof-shape terminals in ANTIQUES in 1944 there were only four of these interesting survivals from seventeenth-century Dutch New York households known in America. Now two more hoof spoons have come to light.

 

Fig. 1-Silver hoof spoon, probably New York, seventeenth century. Length 6 9/16 inches. Inscribed F-A on the flat of the hoof. It is nearly identical to the spoon shown in Figs. 2, 2a. Private collection; photograph by Meyers Studio.

 

 

 

One bears the initials of the unidentified first owner F-A, in seventeenth-century lettering on the flat of the hoof, but is otherwise unmarked (Figs. 1, 1a). It appears to be identical to a spoon made by Ahasuerus Hendricks (Figs. 2, 2a) that was discussed and illustrated in Miss Smith's article, except that the bowl of the spoon in Figure 1 is slightly larger than that of the Hendricks example. In both cases, the …» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Skippets

July 1, 1978  |  By J. S. BROWN; From The Magazine ANTIQUES, July 1978.

Skippets are small boxes made to hold and protect pendent wax seals attached to important documents. Silver, silver-gilt, and gold examples were used by the United States government between 1815 and 1871, primarily on treaties with other countries that had been ratified by Congress. The skippet was suspended from the treaty by woven strands of gold or silver, often entwined with strands of silk, which had been threaded through the box before the hot wax was poured in. The wax was impressed with the great seal of the United States, and the cover of the box was hand chased with a design based on the seal.

The first skippet made for the United States government was for the Treaty of Ghent, which settled the War of 1812 with England. Now in the Hall of Records in London, it is marked by the Georgetown silversmith Charles A. Burnett. His shop on Bridge Street was not far from the bookshop and bindery of Joseph Milligan, to who…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

A desk associated with George Washington

May 1, 1978  |  By JOAN SAYERS BROW; from The Magazine ANTIQUES May 1978.

The  handsome slant-front desk illustrated here was originally owned by Colonel George William Fairfax (1724-1787), whose estate, Bevoir, was near Mount Vernon on the Potomac River in Virginia. In April 1773 Fairfax took his wife, sally Cary, to England, after asking his neighbor George Washington to watch over Belvoir while they were away. Washington wrote to Fairfax from Mount Vernon on January 19,1773, "As you only require that I should have an eye to the conduct of your Steward or manager, and to remit his Collections, I can do it with very little difficulty." According to Fairfax family tradition, the desk was moved from Belvoir to Mount Vernon at this time to hold the plantation's papers.

 Slant-front desk, American, 1769-1772. Mahogany, with pine and poplar the secondary woods; height 48, width 36, depth 34 inches. The brasses are old replacements. The slides tha tpull out to support the top are long narrow draw…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Japanese screens

January 1, 1971  |  

 By Ruth Davidson; Originally published in January 1971

For the enchantment of visitors to Asia House Gallery this month and next there will be on view byōbu, or Japanese painted screens, from twelve museums and private collections in New York. Arranged so as to suggest their appearance in a Japanese house, the twenty six screens will be shown in two groups, the first from January 14 through February 14 and the second from February 16 through March 14. (The address of Asia House is 112 East 64th street, New York, 10021).

Byōbu, decorative and useful pieces of household equipment that are at once art objects, like the framed pictures that hang on the walls of fine houses here, and architectural components that serve as temporary walls or partitions, make a direct appeal to Western eyes. Their clear and compelling design, their brilliant or, again, subtle and low keyed color schemes, and the poetry of thei…» More

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