From the Archives | By Archived articles

SARAH GOODRIDGE

May 1, 1947  |  By AGNES M. DODS; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, May 1947.

THE WORK OF SARAH GOODRIDGE, one of the lesser known miniature painters of New England, has been increasing steadily in popularity for some years. Although her claim to fame rests mainly on her miniature of Gilbert Stuart, a diligent search of the countryside has brought to light many excellent likenesses from her brush.

Biographical material concerning this artist is somewhat meager. We do know that she was born in Templeton, Massachusetts, February 5, 1788, the daughter of Ebenezer and Beulah (Childs) Goodridge. Her father was an itinerant shoemaker whose duties took him far from home and his somewhat unusual family. Eben, an older son, made organs and later went to Boston where he taught music. David, another son, became a physician, while Eliza also developed artistic talent.

Sarah's first artistic attempts were pictures drawn on the sanded floor of the kitchen with a sharp stick or scratched on white birch logs p…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Painters of the Hudson River school

March 1, 1945  |  By FREDERICK A. SWEET; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, March 1945.

Toward the end of the nineteenth century America's art collectors were captivated by French taste and filled their gilt drawing rooms with salon figure pieces and bucolic scenes by members of the Barbizon school. Our own painters such as George Inness and Homer Martin, had to follow French trends, in order to gain favor, and American landscape painters of an earlier generation sank gradually into oblivion. With all the scholarly work done in the art field, it is surprising to realize how little attention Americans have paid to their own painters. Only in the past few years have they begun to emerge again, and even today these landscape painters of the early nineteenth century, called the Hudson River school, remain too largely neglected. Their work is of the greatest of importance not only because it represents a significant phase of the Romantic Movement, but also because of the influence it had on men of a later …» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Bringing an Old house back to life

February 1, 1945  |  By MARGARET NOWELL; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, February 1945. 

There are few more worth-while experiences than bringing back to life an old house. This is what Mr. and Mrs. John Howard Joynt have done with the handsome brick house at 601 Duke Street in Alexandria, Virginia.

Fig. 1-The house, with its gray brick wall, encloses two sides of the property, and overlooks an authentic eighteenth-century garden. The 1810 wing is behind the main part of the house, built in 1785, whose façade is shown here. 

The main house, with the kitchens which are separated from it by a thirty-foot courtyard, was built in 1785 by Benjamin Dulaney. It was occupied by him and his family until purchased by Robert I. Taylor in 1810. Taylor joined the kitchens to the main house by a two-floor addition which provided a dining room on the garden level, and small bedrooms above. From this time on the house was owned by only two other families until acquired by its present owners in 1934. Since it has …» More

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The Market | By Archived articles

Early American glass

August 1, 1941  |  By Helen McKearin; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, August 1941.

FOR MOST STUDENTS and collectors "early American glass" is a comprehensive term indifferent to the factors of time and foreign influence. It bridges the widening stream of American glass manufacture from colonial days well through the mid-nineteenth century, covering all the various types and designs of glass which collectors have netted from that stream. While the term "early," as usually applied to a given piece of American glass, has its own peculiar variability, its implied time element is less general. It refers largely to the period when a given design, decorative technique, or method of manufacture joined the stream of American glass production. While patient students of the last two decades have pinned down many facts regarding these facets of American glass, the multitudinous problems they present are by no means completely solved.

Until the 1920's only two glassmaking centers had been the object of intens…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

The Care of Pewter

November 1, 1938  |  By John W. Poole

[Originally published November 1938; posted in conjunction with Barrymore Laurence Scherer's "American Pewter," March/April 2013.]

IN ADDITION to the desirability of maintaining the value of personal property, the owner of antiquities possessing historical and cultural significance owes a very definite obligation to posterity. In some fields, little or none of this responsibility may be shifted to our museums. Especially is this true of American pewter. Comparatively little early American pewter of superior quality has as yet been acquired by these institutions. Even the best museum collections in this field fall far short, both in scope and quality, of any one among several private collections.

To my deep regret, ignorance during my apprentice period as a collector resulted in the deterioration of some of my prized pewter. The lessons learned from that hard experience I now pass on to those who care to use them.

 This exceptional 7-inch high quart tanka…» More

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NYG 2013

[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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