From the Archives | By Archived articles

Some early American crewelwork

May 1, 1951  |  By FLORENCE PETO; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, May 1951.

Eighteenth-century crewelwork, especially favored for bedspreads and bed furnishings, is one of the most delightful types of early American embroidery.  Though it has become very scarce, resolute seekers may still occasionally acquire a piece. 

 

 

Tree of Life Design, crewelwork fragment with leaves, fruit, birds, insects, and caterpillar. New York Historical Society.

 

 The "crewel" in which the designs were worked was a loosely twisted wool yarn.  That which was made commercially came in three grades, a heavy one for tapestry, a medium one for general use, and a two-ply zephyr for the finest embroideries.  Very often, however, the yarn was spun at home.  In fact, all the steps of the processes might be carried out on the needle-woman's own property, from the raising of the sheep to the carding, spinning, and dyeing of the wool.  The quality of the yarn was affected by the quality of the sheep, the manner in whic…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

A Demonstration in Pewter Making

September 1, 1949  |  By L. M. A. ROY

[Originally published September 1949 ; posted in conjunction with Barrymore Laurence Scherer's "American Pewter," March/April 2013.]

Mr. Roy's model for this pictorial demonstration was John G. Herrock, "whose family," he says," were tinkering with tools from the time they came to Maine in 1799."  Besides pewter, he makes violins, reproductions of colonial furniture, wrought iron, jewelry, and clocks. 

Click the below slideshow for a step-by-step tutorial into the making of pewter objects.

 

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Pugilism in English Pottery

January 1, 1948  |  By PAUL MAGRIEL; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, January 1948.

Paul Magriel was formerly on the staff of the Museum of Modern Art, where he arranged a number of exhibitions on the history of dancing. His exhibition, The Ring and the Glove, on view at the Museum of the City of New York until April 4, 1948, is the first full-scale retrospective exhibition of the history of British and American boxing. Made up largely from his collection, it includes paintings, prints, sculpture, and ceramics of this subject, some of which are illustrated here. Mr. Magriel is editor of the Ballet Society, which has had published through Henry Holt & Company a series of monographs on the dancers Nijinsky, Isadora Duncan, and Anna Pavlova. His newest book, Chronicles of American Dance, also a Ballet Society publication, will be out sometime this month.

The British interest in sports and pastimes has a long history. From the sixteenth century it has been manifested in the pictorial arts and the roster …» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

SARAH GOODRIDGE

May 1, 1947  |  By AGNES M. DODS; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, May 1947.

THE WORK OF SARAH GOODRIDGE, one of the lesser known miniature painters of New England, has been increasing steadily in popularity for some years. Although her claim to fame rests mainly on her miniature of Gilbert Stuart, a diligent search of the countryside has brought to light many excellent likenesses from her brush.

Biographical material concerning this artist is somewhat meager. We do know that she was born in Templeton, Massachusetts, February 5, 1788, the daughter of Ebenezer and Beulah (Childs) Goodridge. Her father was an itinerant shoemaker whose duties took him far from home and his somewhat unusual family. Eben, an older son, made organs and later went to Boston where he taught music. David, another son, became a physician, while Eliza also developed artistic talent.

Sarah's first artistic attempts were pictures drawn on the sanded floor of the kitchen with a sharp stick or scratched on white birch logs p…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Painters of the Hudson River school

March 1, 1945  |  By FREDERICK A. SWEET; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, March 1945.

Toward the end of the nineteenth century America's art collectors were captivated by French taste and filled their gilt drawing rooms with salon figure pieces and bucolic scenes by members of the Barbizon school. Our own painters such as George Inness and Homer Martin, had to follow French trends, in order to gain favor, and American landscape painters of an earlier generation sank gradually into oblivion. With all the scholarly work done in the art field, it is surprising to realize how little attention Americans have paid to their own painters. Only in the past few years have they begun to emerge again, and even today these landscape painters of the early nineteenth century, called the Hudson River school, remain too largely neglected. Their work is of the greatest of importance not only because it represents a significant phase of the Romantic Movement, but also because of the influence it had on men of a later …» More

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NYG 2013

[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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