Current & Coming | By Barrymore Laurence Scherer

About books

September 8, 2014  |  History of Design: Decorative Arts and Material Culture, 1400-2000, ed. Pat Kirkham and Susan Weber (Bard Graduate Center and Yale University Press). 698 pp., color and b/w illus.

Books about design history abound, but this one may be the first to embrace both Western and Eastern design over the course of six centuries. The discussions address virtually every expected subject: furniture, textiles and costume, glass and ceramics, metalwork, and product design. But the book goes beyond these to include interior design, landscape and garden design, and even stage and film design.

 The work of twenty-seven contributors, the volume is cogently arranged in four chronological sections. Within each section separate chapters discuss the development of design in its major global regions: East Asia, India, the Islamic world, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Literally hundreds of objects are depicted and examined within their historical and social context. We also witness the interpla…» More

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The Market | By Barrymore Laurence Scherer

New collector: Spratling silver

July 28, 2014  |  The son of Dr. William P. Spratling, a celebrated neurologist and pioneer in treating epilepsy, William Spratling had a tragic childhood, losing his mother and a sister when he was ten, and his father five years later. He went on to Auburn University in Alabama, where he majored in architecture and was apparently teaching the subject there within two years of his arrival. At twenty-one he became an associate professor of architecture at Tulane University in New Orleans, and during the ensuing years he also wrote on architecture and related subjects for Scribner's Magazine, the Journal of the American Institute of Architects, and other publications.

His personal charm, his intellectual abilities, and his writing (he was eventually the author of eight books including an autobiography) gained him entrée into literary circles, where he forged close friendships with such luminaries as Sherwood Anderson, John Dos Passos, and William Faulkner. Faulkner and Spratling lived together …» More

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The Market | By Barrymore Laurence Scherer

New collector: Botanical prints

May 21, 2014  |  Although the earliest surviving illustrated botanical manuscript dates from AD 512-the Vienna Dioscurides, a copy of the important medical treatise by the first-century Greek physician and herbalist Pedanius Dioscurides-botanical illustration as a distinctive artistic genre developed in the fifteenth century with the rise of illustrated herbals, manuscripts explaining the medicinal and culinary uses of plants and flowers. After all, in an age living close to the ground, it was crucial to distinguish between a plant that could induce sleep and one that would induce it forever. The introduc­tion of exotic new plants from Asia and the Americas during the sixteenth century prompted continuous pub­lication of accurate pictures to help botanists study, name, and classify the new discoveries. Continued refine­ments to reproductive engraving and lithographic techniques furthered these publications during the eigh­teenth and nineteenth centuries. Most techniques produced black-and-white…» More

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The Market | By Barrymore Laurence Scherer

The new collector: American bronzes

February 20, 2014  |  The Italian Renaissance taste for classical art fostered a revival of bronze statuary, wealthy connoisseurs collecting both antique statuettes and new works by artists like Donatello and Verrochio. Likewise, the nineteenth-century fascination with Renaissance art created an even larger market for bronze sculpture. Post-Civil War American sculptors, many European-trained, followed suit.

Cupid by Frederick William MacMonnies (1863-1937), 1895, balances gracefully on a globe while gesturing teas­ingly to lovers.  Signed and dated "F. MacMonnies / 1895" on back of globe and with the French found­ry mark on the base.  Bronze; height 26 ¼ inches. $50,000.  Hirschl and Adler Galleries, New York.

Weighty and rich in appearance, bronze is primarily an alloy of copper and tin, sometimes lead or zinc. Because the alloys are stronger, have a lower melting point, and are easier to mold into intricate shapes, bronze is better suited to casting than pure copper. Ancient Greeks and Romans fa…» More

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Current & Coming | By Barrymore Laurence Scherer

Japanese bamboo art: A living tradition

May 8, 2013  |  Basket weaving is one of the most ancient of all decorative crafts. It is thought that the idea to create vessels by interweaving twigs was conceived around the same time as the idea to chip shards of flint into arrowheads. Fragments of Neolithic-age pottery reveal that long before the invention of the wheel, potters molded clay around woven basket forms, while remnants of other Stone Age pottery bear surface decoration imitating basketwork. Though fired pottery is more durable than baskets, thanks to the arid climate of ancient Egypt many of the world's oldest baskets and basket fragments have been unearthed there, dating some three thousand years before Christ. Indeed, wherever there were twigs, reeds, tall grasses, or other weavable plants, basketry thrived.

Some of history's most beautiful bas­kets were produced in Japan, where the craft of plaiting bamboo was initially practiced on a utilitarian level during the Jômon period (10,000-300 bc). Bamboo, a grass, proliferate…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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