Current & Coming | By Cynthia Drayton

Museum and Garden openings around the country

April 17, 2014  |  

CONNECTICUT

New Canaan:  Philip Johnson Glass House (May 1 - Nov. 30);Vukjiko Nakaya: Veil: The artist will use fog to create atmospheric effects in the Glass House's first site-specific artist project.

Night by Vincent Fecteau: Contemporary artists create a series of sculptures inspired by Giacometti's sculpture Night, which are displayed on the Mies van der Rohe coffee table where Giacometti's sculpture was displayed prior to being sent for repair to his studio in the mid-1960s. Giacometti died during the restoration and the sculpture was never returned to the Glass House.

Old Lyme:  Chadwick Studio and Rafal Landscape Center at the Florence Griswold Museum  (April 6 - Oct 31); the American impressionist painter William Chadwick used this structure as his studio from around 1920 until his death in 1962.

DELAWARE

WilmingtonNemours Mansion and Gardens (May 1 - Dec 31); designed by Carrère and Hastings in the late eighteenth-century French style, Nemours was built by Alfr…» More

|
Add a Comment
|

Current & Coming | By Cynthia Drayton

New exhibition of Renaissance and Baroque bronzes at the Frick Collection

February 20, 2014  |  New York City's Frick Collection recently opened an exhibition of Renaissance and Baroque bronzes from the collection of Janine and J. Tomilson Hill. Displayed are thirty-three statuettes, sculptures, and a relief by masters of the Italian, German, Dutch, and French schools of the late fifteenth into the eighteenth century. One highlight is a pair of bronzes titled Sleeping Hermaphrodite and Reclining Venus after terracotta models attributed to François Duquesnoy and Thibault Poissant commissioned by the celebrated seventeenth-century French sculptor François Girardon for his personal collection. An added pleasure for admirers of French decorative arts is that the gilded-wood couches supporting the bronzes are attributed to the versatile French designer Gilles-Marie Oppenord, Girardon's neighbor at the Louvre. Oppenord did a series of drawings of Girardon's sculpture collection, including these bronzes, in imaginary architectural settings, which were engraved and published by N…» More

|
Add a Comment
|

The Market | By Cynthia Drayton

Record-breaking folk art at Sotheby's

January 28, 2014  |  Sotheby's set a record on Saturday, January 25, with the sale of the Ralph O. Esmerian Collection of Folk Art. The 228 lots reached a total of $12,955,943 eclipsing the previous record set by Sotheby's in 1994 with the sale of the Bertram K. and Nina Fletcher Little Collection.

Saturday's top lot was the 1923 figure of Santa Claus by the Brooklyn-born artist Samuel Anderson Robb, which sold for $875,000, more than three times the pre-sale estimate of $150,000 to $200,000. A rare carved pine pheasant hen weathervane once in the collection of the influential folk art dealer Edith Gregor Halpert achieved $449,000; and Ruth Whittier Shute and Samuel Addison Shute's c. 1832 portrait of Jeremiah H. Emerson of Nashua, New Hampshire, realized $665,000. The c.1816 double portrait of John Bickel and Caterina Bickel from Jonestown in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, painted by Jacob Maentel reached $401,000.

Santa Claus by Samuel Anderson Robb, New York, c. 1923. Sotheby's New York. 

 

 …» More

|
Add a Comment
|

The Market | By Cynthia Drayton

Sir Geoffrey de Bellaigue (1931-2013)

January 30, 2013  |   


© Lucy Dickens / National Portrait Gallery, London

 

 

 

 

The noted authority on eighteenth-century French furniture and Sèvres porcelain, Sir Geoffrey de Bellaigue, Surveyor Emeritus of the Queen's Works of Art died on January 4, 2013.

The pinnacle of Sir Geoffrey's research and study was the three-volume catalogue, French Porcelain in the Collection of Her Majesty the Queen, published in 2009. In reviewing it for the Art Newspaper, Aileen Dawson described it as a "sumptuous catalogue which is a pleasure to read and a mine of all sorts of information."

Shortly after Sir Geoffrey's birth in France in 1931, his family moved to England. There he attended Wellington and Trinity College, but after a brief stint as a banker he went to Paris to study at the École du Louvre under Pierre Verlet, the leading authority on royal French furniture and decorative arts.

In 1960 Sir Geoffrey was hired to work at Waddesdon Manor, the Rothschild château in Buckinghamshire, and was ap…» More

|
Add a Comment
|

| By Cynthia Drayton

Query: Seeking Stretch

July 29, 2010  |  The early Philadelphia clockmaker Peter Stretch (1670–1746) and his two clockmaking sons, Thomas (1697-1765) and William (1701-1748), are the subject of a forthcoming catalogue raisonné to be published by the Winterthur Museum and Country Estate in Delaware.

Peter Stretch was born in Leek in Staffordshire, England, and apprenticed with his older brother Samuel, a clockmaker who specialized in lantern clocks there. A Quaker, Peter Stretch and his wife and three sons left England for Philadelphia in 1703. He set up his shop on the southwest corner of Second and Chestnut Streets known as “Peter Stretch’s Corner,” where he made and sold clocks and imported wares. He joined the Common Council of Philadelphia in 1708, and nine years later received a commission from the council to work on the town clock.

Stretch produced a wide range of clocks, including thirty-hour and eight-day ones with engraved brass movements, plain dials, and single hands — more elaborate ones with a sweep s…» More

|
Add a Comment
|
Thank you for signing up.
NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

» View All
Peabody Essex Museum
» Details
Peter H. Eaton Antiques
» Details
Questroyal Fine Art, LLC.
» Details