The Market | By Cynthia Drayton

Sir Geoffrey de Bellaigue (1931-2013)

January 30, 2013  |   


© Lucy Dickens / National Portrait Gallery, London

 

 

 

 

The noted authority on eighteenth-century French furniture and Sèvres porcelain, Sir Geoffrey de Bellaigue, Surveyor Emeritus of the Queen's Works of Art died on January 4, 2013.

The pinnacle of Sir Geoffrey's research and study was the three-volume catalogue, French Porcelain in the Collection of Her Majesty the Queen, published in 2009. In reviewing it for the Art Newspaper, Aileen Dawson described it as a "sumptuous catalogue which is a pleasure to read and a mine of all sorts of information."

Shortly after Sir Geoffrey's birth in France in 1931, his family moved to England. There he attended Wellington and Trinity College, but after a brief stint as a banker he went to Paris to study at the École du Louvre under Pierre Verlet, the leading authority on royal French furniture and decorative arts.

In 1960 Sir Geoffrey was hired to work at Waddesdon Manor, the Rothschild château in Buckinghamshire, and was ap…» More

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| By Cynthia Drayton

Query: Seeking Stretch

July 29, 2010  |  The early Philadelphia clockmaker Peter Stretch (1670–1746) and his two clockmaking sons, Thomas (1697-1765) and William (1701-1748), are the subject of a forthcoming catalogue raisonné to be published by the Winterthur Museum and Country Estate in Delaware.

Peter Stretch was born in Leek in Staffordshire, England, and apprenticed with his older brother Samuel, a clockmaker who specialized in lantern clocks there. A Quaker, Peter Stretch and his wife and three sons left England for Philadelphia in 1703. He set up his shop on the southwest corner of Second and Chestnut Streets known as “Peter Stretch’s Corner,” where he made and sold clocks and imported wares. He joined the Common Council of Philadelphia in 1708, and nine years later received a commission from the council to work on the town clock.

Stretch produced a wide range of clocks, including thirty-hour and eight-day ones with engraved brass movements, plain dials, and single hands — more elaborate ones with a sweep s…» More

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Current & Coming | By Cynthia Drayton

Query: Edwin Scott Bennett

February 3, 2010  |  An "artist turned photographer of artists," Edwin Scott Bennett (1847-1915) is the subject of a forthcoming article.

Edwin Scott Bennett lived and worked in New York in the late nineteenth century. Bennett initially studied landscape painting under William De Haas and figure painting under William Morgan, and then later took up photography. He took photographs of prominent American painters and sculptors including George Inness, John George Brown, Eastman Johnson, William Merritt Chase, Daniel Chester French, John Henry Twachtman, and Childe Hassam. During the early to mid-1890s, Bennett exhibited many of his photographs of artists at the annual exhibitions of the Society of Amateur Photographers of New York. Later in that decade, he took photographs to accompany many articles by the American writer Theodore Dreiser. At the time of his death, Bennett lived at 51 West 10th Street, the Tenth Street Studio building, where many artists whose photographs had been taken by him had maintained studios over the years.
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Current & Coming | By Cynthia Drayton

Query: Cured, Fermented and Smoked Foods

February 1, 2010  |  The Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, the annual conference on food history, is seeking papers on the topic "Cured, Fermented and Smoked Foods," to be held at Saint Antony's College in Oxford, England, on July 9 - 11, 2010. For further information on the conference visit the Web site, www.oxfordsymposium.org.uk.

From antiquity to modern times, mankind has developed methods for preserving food, often out of necessity but also for taste alone. Suggested topics are the story behind cured, fermented, or smoked products; examine the chemical actions of curing; or investigate the health benefits and risks of food preservation. If accepted, a final paper of no more than 5,000 words will be due on May 1st.
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| By Cynthia Drayton

Queries: Jewelry designer and metal artist Marie Zimmermann

October 8, 2009  |  The versatile jewelry designer and metalsmith Marie Zimmermann (1879-1972) is the subject of a forthcoming monograph sponsored by the American Decorative Art 1900 Foundation.

Born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1879, Zimmermann's training in the arts began with courses in drawing, painting, and modeling at the Art Students League in New York likely followed by courses in art metalwork at Brooklyn's Pratt Institute, 1901-1903.  Zimmermann joined the National Arts Club in New York in 1901, and subsequently established a studio within its premises at 15 Gramercy Park.  Zimmermann participated in exhibitions of arts and crafts and contemporary art nationwide throughout her career, beginning with entries in the "First Annual Exhibition of Original Designs for Decorations and Examples of Art Crafts" at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1902-03. She showed at the National Arts Club as well as at commercial galleries in New York City, and organized a one-person retrospective of her work at the…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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Antiques Council
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Christopher H. Jones
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Elizabeth Locke Jewels
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