The Market | By Laura Beach

Seen and Heard

March 19, 2014  |  ART FAIR OVERLOAD?

With the show season in full swing, "collectors are heading into the fray this year with a serious case of art-fair overload," Kelly Crow posits in the Wall Street Journal here and here.

Crow says "at least 200 large fairs now jam the art-world calendar-complete with attendant parties and smaller satellite fairs in tow." Before anyone could actually ponder the consequences of perpetual motion it was time to be off again, from the Art Fair and the Armory Show in New York to the European Fine Art Fair (TEFAF) in Maastricht, The Netherlands, then back to NewYork for Asia Week, all in the space of two weeks in March.

TEFAF STARTS STRONG...

Preliminary reports are in for the European Fine Art Fair, which organizers say attracted over 10,000 private and institutional collectors from around the world for the most successful opening day in its history.  The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired a c. 1690 parcel-gilt ostrich ewer and basin from J. Kugel Antiquaires…» More

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The Market | By Laura Beach

Seen and Heard

March 10, 2014  |  TRANSITIONS

London-based Asian art specialist Ben Janssens, who was injured in a cycling accident last August, has resigned as chairman of the European Fine Art Fair after seven years. He will continue serving on TEFAF's board of trustees and as chairman of its Antiquairs section. Willem van Roijen succeeds Janssens, replacing acting TEFAF chairman Robert Aronson.

Joshua W. Lane (left) has been named the Lois F. and Henry S. McNeil Curator of Furniture at Winterthur Museum. Lane, curator of furniture at Historic Deerfield since 2000, assumes the post on April 14. He directed Historic Deerfield's Summer Fellowship Program between 2005 and 2012.  Lane replaces Wendy Cooper, who retired last year.

Malcolm Rogers, director of Boston's Museum of Fine Arts since 1994, will retire.  The activist director oversaw an era of explosive growth at the MFA culminating with the opening of the new Art of the Americas Wing in 2010 but was at times criticized at times for his aggressive …» More

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The Market | By Laura Beach

Comings and goings

March 4, 2014  |  Comings and Goings

Joshua W. Lane has been named the Lois F. and Henry S. McNeil Curator of Furniture at Winterthur Museum. Lane, curator of furniture at Historic Deerfield since 2000, assumes the post on April 14. He directed Historic Deerfield's Summer Fellowship Program between 2005 and 2012.  Lane replaces Wendy Cooper, who retired last year.

 

Malcolm Rogers, director of Boston's Museum of Fine Arts since 1994, will retire.  The activist director oversaw an era of explosive growth at the MFA culminating with the opening of the new Art of the Americas Wing in 2010 but was at times criticized at times for his aggressive management style. Rogers, who is staying until a successor is found, also announced two new curatorial chairs. Frederick Ilchman will head Art of Europe while Benjamin Weiss leads Prints, Drawings, and Photographs.

 

Helen A. Cooper is retiring May as Yale University Art Gallery's curator of American paintings and sculpture. Director Jock Reynol…» More

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The Market | By Laura Beach

Banning ivory: A nuanced approach needed

February 24, 2014  |  What began as a well-intentioned effort to halt the wanton slaughter of elephants has resulted in sweeping restrictions on the U.S. trade in elephant ivory.  As part of the Obama administration's broader strategy to combat wildlife trafficking, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on February 11 announced new regulations prohibiting all imports, even antiques made partly or entirely of the material. The rules, say dealers in historic works of art, denigrate cultural heritage while failing to stop poachers, who will likely find ready markets for ivory elsewhere in the world.

The regulations also limit exports to objects that are demonstrably one hundred years or older, apparently preventing an American dealer or institution from selling an inlaid Ruhlmann cabinet of 1926 to a European client. Selling documented antique ivory across state lines remains lawful, as does intrastate trade in objects imported lawfully prior to 1990 or 1975, depending on whether the ivory is…» More

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The Market | By Laura Beach

On the money (and in the air)

May 30, 2013  |  Buncheong bottle

Bottle, Korean, Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), fif­teenth to sixteenth century.  Stoneware with iron oxide underglaze decoration; height 11 inches.

 

WHY

Kang Collection, Manhattan specialists in Korean art, sold this pear-shaped wine bottle during New York's Asia Week in March. Priced at $25,000, it is an example of buncheong, a brushed white-slip stoneware mainly made by monks at Mount Kaeryong in southern Chungchong province, says Kang Collection president Keum Ja Kang. The bottle's vigorous freehand decoration in iron oxide underglaze de­picts a stylized ginseng plant.

TAKEAWAY

Art Across America, the first-ever survey display of more than two hundred years of American fine and decorative art to travel to South Korea, remains on view at the Dae­jeon Museum of Art through September 1. It draws from the collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Terra Foundatio…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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