Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Farther afield: The Magna Carta turns 800

July 1, 2015  |  

A dedicated website (magnacarta 800th.com) showcases the exhibitions, tours, and special events across the U.K. this season in celebration of the eight hundredth anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta. The British Library’s exhibition provides the most penetrating inquiry into this historic document and displays the two manuscript copies of 1215 conserved there. The show places them into context with objects, art, manuscripts, and even royal remains that conjure the showdown between King John and the barons on the field of Runnymede.

It also explores the far-reaching ways that this seminal defense of the law has held through ensuing centuries. The exhibition includes a copy of the English Bill of Rights as well as Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence and the Delaware copy of the U.S. Bill of Rights. It also features documents by Churchill, Gandhi, and Mandela that have directly referenced the Magna Carta and highlights movements such …» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Editor's letter, May/June 2015

May 26, 2015  |  We missed something this spring, and at this point all I can do is urge you not to miss it too. I refer to When the Curtain Never Comes Down at the American Folk Art Museum, closing July 5. There is much to say, even much to debate, about what is happening with outsider art in the museum’s galleries, and had their schedule and ours meshed there would have been many pages in this issue devoted to saying it. To be brief, the exhibition has assembled several rich examples of outsider art from the late nineteenth century to the present that merge into performance, into film, into music, and most of all into magnificent self-display. There is no catalogue yet, but there will be one eventually so that is some consolation. Many of the twenty seven artists will be unfamiliar, coming as they do from all over the globe—from Brazil, Russia, Italy, and Germany but also from Alton, Illinois, Detroit, and New Jersey. No matter. The work is beautiful, sometimes unsettling, frequently moving, …» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Current and coming: Coney Island in Hartford

April 27, 2015  |   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There will be four venues in the coming year for the exhibition Coney Island: Visions of An American Dreamland, 1861 - 2008. Would that there were forty more so that everyone within earshot of a carnival barker's cry could gaze at this mirror of our nation at moral, aesthetic, and economic leisure over a century and a half. From its first stop, at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, where Robin Jaffee Frank, prime mover of the exhibition, is chief curator, to its last in San Antonio, the exhibition's 140 objects offer what Frank describes as a "touchstone for complex ideas about the American dream." And it is not all Weegee and freaks and funny rides by a long shot. Sanford Robinson Gifford's 1866 The Beach at Coney Island, among the first depictions of the sandy spit of land, is a dreamlike respite with just a touch of the coming carnival in the distance. From this and a few other early seaside scenes the exhibition moves almost as ra…» More

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From the editor's desk | By ANTIQUES Staff

Editor's letter, March/April 2015

March 31, 2015  |  The divide between “pure” art (painting and sculpture mostly) and functional art (lighting, ceramics, furniture, and so much else) comes and goes in history depending on who has the power to enforce its shaky distinctions. Just now the contemporary art market tilts toward the healthy side of the issue: a table by Urs Fischer, for instance, is a work of art that functions as a table. No questions asked.

It was not always so, and I like to think that the rising appreciation of the arts and crafts movement did more than its share to reunite artist and craftsman in our eyes. But it took a while. When I happened upon Robert Judson Clark’s exhibition of American arts and crafts objects in 1972 at Princeton University it was a surprise and a revelation. Abstract expressionism and pop art were art. Craft was not. A certain sniffiness about the latter lingered in the decades to come. We are long past that point now, as you will see in Rachel Delphia’s superb article on a private collec…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

End notes: Sylvia L. Yount takes charge of the Met's American Wing

March 16, 2015  |  Based as we are in New York, the staff of The Magazine ANTIQUES has a fond if not proprietary tendency to look upon the Metropolitan Museum of Art, especially its American Wing, as our “local” museum. So when we heard the news that the redoubtable Morrison H. Heckscher was retiring after forty-eight years, thirteen of them as head of the American Wing, we were especially curious about who could possibly fill his shoes.

Like so many others, we are delighted to see that Sylvia L. Yount has gamely stepped right into them. Yount, who comes to the Met after seven years as the chief curator at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (where her work was “transformative” says VMFA director Alex Nyerges), is particularly admired for her collegial approach. Andrew Walker, director of the Amon Carter Museum, who went to graduate school in art history with her, notes Yount’s “collaborative skills, respect for the past, and the ability to find the right path of innovation”—talents that she has al…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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Martyn Gregory
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Philip H. Bradley Co.
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