Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Talking antiques: Winter Antiques Show

January 20, 2015  |  We asked exhibitors at the Winter Antiques Show to highlight one exceptional object in their booths and describe it as they might to an interested collector. Here are the things they chose, along with some of their comments.

 

ALLAN AND PENNY KATZ

This artful rendering of a birdcage in the shape of the United States Capitol Building was undoubtedly made as a Centennial celebration piece in 1876. It retains its original patriotic colors and was created by our favorite artist, Anonymous. 

 

ARONSON ANTIQUAIRS

Robert Aronson recently discovered an exceptional, large (approximately 16 ½ inches tall) Delft bouquetière in the shape of an elegantly dressed gentleman that appears to match a figure of Mary II, or Mary Stuart, that he had previously acquired. Mary and William of Orange ruled Holland and England during the Glorious Revolution from 1689 until her death in 1694. The figures are attributed to the Greek A Factory, from which the royal couple ordered many important Delft…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

The Scene, January/February 2015

January 20, 2015  |  In anticipation of this year’s Winter Antiques Show loan exhibition, Ahead of the Curve: The Newark Museum 1909–2015, students from East Side House Settlement—the Winter Antiques Show’s beneficiary since the show started in 1954—toured the museum.

   

 

 

 

Students at the Newark Museum's Ballantine House. Photo by Jay Savulich. 

The Winter Antiques show is known for its sophisticated lending exhibitions, festive opening-night party, large and varied roster of dealers, and rigorous vetting process, but sixty-one years ago it began modestly as a small booth in another show. A board member from the East Side House Settlement, a supplementary education resource center in Yorkville on the Upper East Side, had inherited several trunks of Parisian couture and, along with some of her fellow board members, took a booth at the 1954 National Antiques Show at Madison Square Garden, where they raised $1,700 for East Side House. Just one year later the board secured the Seventh Regime…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Cartier in Denver

November 21, 2014  |  In Brilliant: Cartier in the 20th Century the Denver Art Museum has taken a seventy-five-year slice (1900-1975) from the illustrious firm's 160-plus-year history and illuminated a central paradox of great jewelry: greatness depends upon designs that capture a keen sense of the zeitgeist but do so with enough sheer awesomeness to stand far above it. And so, the exhibition's vitrines of precious jewelry, clocks, and luxurious accessories are set off by historic film clips, photographs, and period advertising materials. Two world wars, a worldwide depression, a wave of nihilism, and a new aristocracy of celebrities may have made their mark on Cartier's designs, but in the end, great jewelry just enduringly is, and therein lies much of its fascination.

Above: Crocodile necklace made by Cartier as a special order for Mexican film actress María Félix, 1975. Gold, dia­monds, emeralds, rubies. Nick Welsh photograph (c) Cartier.

The exhibition is organized around seven themes such as…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

George Caleb Bingham at the Amon Carter Museum

October 31, 2014  |  When Virginia-born George Caleb Bingham was seven, his father lost most of the family's fortune, and they moved to Missouri to build a new life, settling first in Franklin, on the banks of the Missouri River, and later on a farm in Saline County. Who knows what would have caught his imagination had Bingham stayed in Virginia, but there is no question that life on and near the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers as the nation moved westward brought him lasting fame as a painter, providing him with subject matter that satisfied both his artistic aims and his belief in de­mocracy. For the first time, Bingham's river pictures are being examined in depth in an exhibition organized by the Saint Louis Art Museum and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas, where it opens on October 2.

Above:  The Wood-Boat by George Caleb Bingham 91811 - 1879), 1850.  Saint Louis Art Museum. 

At a time when images of the West proliferated--in paintings, prints, maps, magazine illustr…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Schoolgirl needlework at the Morven Museum

October 31, 2014  |  This year marks the 350th anniversary of NewJersey, a milestone celebrated across the state with events and pro­grams highlighting innova­tion, diversity, and liberty. The Morven Museum and Garden in Princeton is marking the occa­sion with an exhibition that in­troduces all three themes. Hail Specimen of Female Art! New Jersey Schoolgirl Needlework, 1726-1860 brings together 150 examples of needlework made in or by New Jersey schoolgirls and organizes them geograph­ically to illustrate connections between the elaborate artworks and utilitarian objects crafted by girls of diverse religious, family, and socioeconomic backgrounds, from the Quaker schools in Burlington County to a luxurious silk-on-silk memorial to George Washington made at the prestigious Folwell School in Philadelphia by a New Jersey native.

Above: Needlework by Kiziah Sharp, Burlington County, New Jersey, 1825. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Diker.

Research for the show has made it pos­sible to exhibit mul…» More

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Where to Go in Summer 2015: A Must-Read Guide for Artistic Summer Destinations i

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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