Current & Coming  |  By Staff

Asia Week in New York City, a to-do list

March 13, 2009  |  With the cancellation of the Haughtons' International Asian Art Fair this year, the Magazine ANTIQUES has assembled a list of alternative events and opportunities for enjoying Asian art and culture in New York this week.

On Saturday, March 14, the Asian Art Dealers of the Upper Eastside New York have arranged an open house (12-8 pm) featuring sixteen of the city's prominent Asian art dealers including John Eskenazi, Hiroshi Yanagi Oriental Art, Joan B. Mirviss, Kaikodo, and KooNewYork. For more information and a full listing of exhibitors visit www.aadueny.com.

From March 14 - 18, New York's longest running show of Asian art and antiques, Arts of Pacific Asia Show will be held at a new location, 7 W New York Merchandise Mart (Fifth Avenue and 34th Street), and this year will include over seventy exhibitors and two special exhibits, Katagami-The Art of the Japanese Paper Stencil, and Lahariya Turbans of Rajasthan. For information and hours visit www.caskeylees.com/shows/4/asian/ny.

From March 15 - 17, Arts of Japan: An Exhibition by the Japanese Art Dealers Association (JADA) will be on view at the Ukrainian Institute of America (79th Street at 5th Avenue) featuring six galleries that specialize in Japanese art. Notable among these is Erik Thomsen who will be showing a selection of important Japanese screens. For more information visit www.jada-ny.org.

A public symposium, Japanese Art in America: Building the Next Generation, will take place on Monday, March 16 at the Japan Society featuring a presentation by Hideki Hayashida, Director of the National Art Center, Tokyo. Other panelists include Joe Earle, Vice President of the Japan Society and Director of the Japan Society Gallery; Yukio Lippitt, associate professor of the humanities at Harvard University; and Willard Clark, collector and founder of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, California. For more information visit www.japansociety.org.

Opening Tuesday, March 17 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Art of the Korean Renaissance, 1400-1600 is a loan exhibition featuring approximately 50 masterworks of painting, ceramics, metalwork, and lacquer. For information and hours visit www.metmuseum.org.

Currently on exhibit at the Asian Society (Open late on Fridays, but closed on Mondays), Asian Journeys: Collecting Art in Post-war America examines the legacy of Sherman E. Lee and John D. Rockefeller III and how art collecting shaped international relations between the United States and Asia. For information and hours visit www.asiasociety.org.

On Thursday, March 19 (8 pm, Alice Tully Hall), Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts presents the Ewha Choral Festival with a performance by the Ewha Alumnae Choir, comprised of 150 alumnae from the Korean Ewha Girl's High School founded by Mrs. Mary F. Scranton in 1886. For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.lincolncenter.org.

At the Guggenheim, Noguchi: The Bollingen Journey 1949-1956 presents an intimate travelogue of Japanese America artist Isamu Noguchi's engagement with Asia as a recipient of several fellowships that allowed him to explore the continent. Also on view, The Third Mind: American Artists Contemplate Asia, 1860-1989 explores the influence of Asian art and philosophy on American artistic practices in the industrial era. For information and hours visit www.guggenheim.org.

Image: Mother Dog and Puppies by Yi Am (1507-1566), Korea, first half of the 16th century. Hanging scroll: ink and color on paper; 64 3/16 x 21 11/16 inches. The National Museum of Korea, Seoul.

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