Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

The Scene, January/February 2015

January 20, 2015  |  In anticipation of this year’s Winter Antiques Show loan exhibition, Ahead of the Curve: The Newark Museum 1909–2015, students from East Side House Settlement—the Winter Antiques Show’s beneficiary since the show started in 1954—toured the museum.

   

 

 

 

Students at the Newark Museum's Ballantine House. Photo by Jay Savulich. 

The Winter Antiques show is known for its sophisticated lending exhibitions, festive opening-night party, large and varied roster of dealers, and rigorous vetting process, but sixty-one years ago it began modestly as a small booth in another show. A board member from the East Side House Settlement, a supplementary education resource center in Yorkville on the Upper East Side, had inherited several trunks of Parisian couture and, along with some of her fellow board members, took a booth at the 1954 National Antiques Show at Madison Square Garden, where they raised $1,700 for East Side House. Just one year later the board secured the Seventh Regime…» More

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Current & Coming | By Carolin C. Young

Farther afield: London’s leather alchemist: Gavin Rookledge, Rooks Books

January 12, 2015  |  Rooks Books produces books (and other leather-wrapped objects) that have a tactile, physical pres­ence while exuding a sense of otherworldly mystery. One might expect to find such volumes in the hands of Gandalf or on the walls of the library at Hogwarts. Each uniquely created binding, made from a vast variety of leathers and other natural skins, seems to say, “touch me, I hold the secrets of the universe.” And yet each commands enough respect to elicit a pause before leafing through the vellum pages, lest one be turned to dust for laying eyes on such knowledge without the proper initiation.

      

Photographs by Debbie Patterson.

These books are, in fact, not made by elves but are cre­ated today in south London by Gavin Rookledge and a team of experts trained in traditional techniques of bookbinding and printing. Some even contain secret compartments that can hide incongruously contempo­rary iPads for living wizards.

Rookledge, when lecturing to art students, defines the …» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Cartier in Denver

November 21, 2014  |  In Brilliant: Cartier in the 20th Century the Denver Art Museum has taken a seventy-five-year slice (1900-1975) from the illustrious firm's 160-plus-year history and illuminated a central paradox of great jewelry: greatness depends upon designs that capture a keen sense of the zeitgeist but do so with enough sheer awesomeness to stand far above it. And so, the exhibition's vitrines of precious jewelry, clocks, and luxurious accessories are set off by historic film clips, photographs, and period advertising materials. Two world wars, a worldwide depression, a wave of nihilism, and a new aristocracy of celebrities may have made their mark on Cartier's designs, but in the end, great jewelry just enduringly is, and therein lies much of its fascination.

Above: Crocodile necklace made by Cartier as a special order for Mexican film actress María Félix, 1975. Gold, dia­monds, emeralds, rubies. Nick Welsh photograph (c) Cartier.

The exhibition is organized around seven themes such as…» More

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Current & Coming | By James Gardner

Suida-Manning Collection at the Blanton Museum

November 1, 2014  |  For art lovers, the most interesting thing in Austin, Texas, is not the LBJ Presidential Library or the grandiose State House--impressive as both of them are--but the Jack S. Blanton Museum of Art on the campus of the University of Texas. A fine example of a university or college museum, it has strong collections of American and Latin American art, as well modern and contemporary. But what raises the Blanton far above most good university museums is its collection of Old Master paintings. What is so special about these works is that they come almost entirely from a single source, the famed Suida-Manning Collection, which the university acquired nearly intact in 1998 and around which it built the stylish Blanton Museum, which opened its doors in 2004.

Above: Saint Cecilia by Simon Vouet, c. 1626. Oil on canvas. The Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas, the Suida-Manning Collection, 1999.

What is so special about the Suida-Manning Collection, relative to most o…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

George Caleb Bingham at the Amon Carter Museum

October 31, 2014  |  When Virginia-born George Caleb Bingham was seven, his father lost most of the family's fortune, and they moved to Missouri to build a new life, settling first in Franklin, on the banks of the Missouri River, and later on a farm in Saline County. Who knows what would have caught his imagination had Bingham stayed in Virginia, but there is no question that life on and near the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers as the nation moved westward brought him lasting fame as a painter, providing him with subject matter that satisfied both his artistic aims and his belief in de­mocracy. For the first time, Bingham's river pictures are being examined in depth in an exhibition organized by the Saint Louis Art Museum and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas, where it opens on October 2.

Above:  The Wood-Boat by George Caleb Bingham 91811 - 1879), 1850.  Saint Louis Art Museum. 

At a time when images of the West proliferated--in paintings, prints, maps, magazine illustr…» More

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[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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