Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Rx for a late spring

April 17, 2014  |  Despite cold temperatures and snow on the ground this mid-April morning, it is spring, one of loveliest harbingers of which is the annual Antique Garden Furniture Fair held at the New York Botanical Garden. Scheduled this year for Friday April 25 through Sunday April 27, with its always delightful preview party and private plant sale on Thursday, April 24 from 6 to 8 pm, the show is a must for collectors and a joy for the uninitiated.  As Paulette Peden of Dawn Hill Antiques says, "It is the premier show in the country for garden enthusiasts and a wonderful venue to show prized garden furnishings."

Fountains, sundials, statuary, bird baths, gates, garden benches, antique wicker, urns and planters, botanical prints, and architectural ornament are just some of the items that will be found in the booths of the more than thirty exhibitors-all  set up in a large tent outside the landmark Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, amid the garden's flowering trees, plants, and shrubs. In additio…» More

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Current & Coming | By Cynthia Drayton

Museum and Garden openings around the country

April 17, 2014  |  

CONNECTICUT

New Canaan:  Philip Johnson Glass House (May 1 - Nov. 30);Vukjiko Nakaya: Veil: The artist will use fog to create atmospheric effects in the Glass House's first site-specific artist project.

Night by Vincent Fecteau: Contemporary artists create a series of sculptures inspired by Giacometti's sculpture Night, which are displayed on the Mies van der Rohe coffee table where Giacometti's sculpture was displayed prior to being sent for repair to his studio in the mid-1960s. Giacometti died during the restoration and the sculpture was never returned to the Glass House.

Old Lyme:  Chadwick Studio and Rafal Landscape Center at the Florence Griswold Museum  (April 6 - Oct 31); the American impressionist painter William Chadwick used this structure as his studio from around 1920 until his death in 1962.

DELAWARE

WilmingtonNemours Mansion and Gardens (May 1 - Dec 31); designed by Carrère and Hastings in the late eighteenth-century French style, Nemours was built by Alfr…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Current and coming: A Philadelphia sampler

April 16, 2014  |  THE PHILADELPHIA ANTIQUES SHOW's hardworking committee, on the job since 1962, this year welcomes the show's new director Catherine Sweeney Singer. From this pairing expect a fresh take on tradition, the best of the past proffered with invigorated ideas for the present. The ga­la preview is April 25, and the show runs through April 29.

Limning a portrait of a place and its people, Historic Deerfield, orga­nizers of this year's loan show, is exhibiting more than thirty eighteenth- and nineteenth-century objects from its collections of Connecticut River Valley fine and decorative art. Many of the items selected by curator Amanda E. Lange have unbroken histories in Deerfield and nearby com­munities in western Massachusetts. Highlights include Ralph Earl's 1799 portrait of Dr. Ebenezer Hunt of Northampton and a pole stand with a screen embroidered about 1810 by Sarah Leavitt of Greenfield.

Associate chairman Leslie Anne Miller will debut her book Start with a House, Finish with a…» More

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Current & Coming | By Eleanor H. Gustafson

Lost imperial Easter Egg found

March 19, 2014  |  In a story that is the stuff of fairy tales, one of the missing imperial Fabergé Easter Eggs made for the Russian royal family has been found and will be on public view at Court Jewellers Wartski in Mayfair, London, in the run up to Easter. The magnificent Third Imperial Easter Egg had turned up in the hands of an unsuspecting American Midwesterner who bought it for its gold value.

Carl Fabergé, goldsmith to the czars, created the lavish imperial Easter eggs for Emperors Alexander III and Nicholas II from 1885 to 1916. Only fifty were ever made, each one unique. After the revolution the imperial eggs were seized by the Bolsheviks. Some they kept, but most were sold to the West. Two were bought by Queen Mary and are part of the British Royal Collection. Many belong to museums, oligarchs, sheikhs, and heiresses. Eight, however, are missing-of which only three are believed to have survived the revolution.

The rediscovered egg was the one given by Alexander III to his wife, Emp…» More

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Current & Coming | By Eleanor H. Gustafson

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile

March 19, 2014  |  The pan roast is back. The herring is coming. The famous Oyster Bar restaurant in New York's Grand Central Terminal reopened last Thursday after a four-month renovation of its 101-year-old interior, particularly a thorough cleaning of its ceiling of interlocking vaults covered with terracotta tiles by the Guastavino firm.  Seeing the tiles fully cleaned and all the edging light bulbs aglow hints at the wonders in store for visitors to the exhibition Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile, opening at the Museum of the City of New York on March 26.


The Oyster Bar is one of more than two hundred  surviving examples of the marvels of engineering and architectural beauty created throughout the five boroughs by Spanish immigrants Rafael Guastavino Sr. and Jr. in the early twentieth century . Their system of structural tile vaults-lightweight, fireproof, low-maintenance, and capable of supporting significant loads-was used by leading architects of the day, …» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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