Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Farther afield: Mannequins at the reopened Musée Bourdelle

July 1, 2015  |  

The Musée Bourdelle reopens after an eight-month renovation with a special exhibition devoted to artists’ mannequins. The show plumbs the “unsettling strangeness” of these objects with a display of rare mannequins from the eighteenth century to the present day as well as paintings, drawings, engravings, and photographs that reveal their relationships with the artists who depicted them. A catalogue has been published to accompany the exhibition, jointly organized with the Fitzwilliam Museum where it was seen earlier.

Visitors to this jewel-like museum will also enjoy the chance to visit the newly freshened house, studio, and gardens of sculptor Antoine Bourdelle.

                 

Top: Neoclassical articulated mannequin, Italian, c. 1810. © Accademia Carrara, Bergamo, Italy. Left: German mennequin, c. 1550. © Private collection, London. Right:  Edison Talking Doll by Thomas A. Edison (1847-1941), c. 1890-1900. Private collection, Norway.

Mannequins: From the Artist’s Studi…» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Farther afield: The Magna Carta turns 800

July 1, 2015  |  

A dedicated website (magnacarta 800th.com) showcases the exhibitions, tours, and special events across the U.K. this season in celebration of the eight hundredth anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta. The British Library’s exhibition provides the most penetrating inquiry into this historic document and displays the two manuscript copies of 1215 conserved there. The show places them into context with objects, art, manuscripts, and even royal remains that conjure the showdown between King John and the barons on the field of Runnymede.

It also explores the far-reaching ways that this seminal defense of the law has held through ensuing centuries. The exhibition includes a copy of the English Bill of Rights as well as Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence and the Delaware copy of the U.S. Bill of Rights. It also features documents by Churchill, Gandhi, and Mandela that have directly referenced the Magna Carta and highlights movements such …» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Editor's letter, May/June 2015

May 26, 2015  |  We missed something this spring, and at this point all I can do is urge you not to miss it too. I refer to When the Curtain Never Comes Down at the American Folk Art Museum, closing July 5. There is much to say, even much to debate, about what is happening with outsider art in the museum’s galleries, and had their schedule and ours meshed there would have been many pages in this issue devoted to saying it. To be brief, the exhibition has assembled several rich examples of outsider art from the late nineteenth century to the present that merge into performance, into film, into music, and most of all into magnificent self-display. There is no catalogue yet, but there will be one eventually so that is some consolation. Many of the twenty seven artists will be unfamiliar, coming as they do from all over the globe—from Brazil, Russia, Italy, and Germany but also from Alton, Illinois, Detroit, and New Jersey. No matter. The work is beautiful, sometimes unsettling, frequently moving, …» More

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Current & Coming | By ANTIQUES Staff

Current and coming: Coney Island in Hartford

April 27, 2015  |   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There will be four venues in the coming year for the exhibition Coney Island: Visions of An American Dreamland, 1861 - 2008. Would that there were forty more so that everyone within earshot of a carnival barker's cry could gaze at this mirror of our nation at moral, aesthetic, and economic leisure over a century and a half. From its first stop, at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, where Robin Jaffee Frank, prime mover of the exhibition, is chief curator, to its last in San Antonio, the exhibition's 140 objects offer what Frank describes as a "touchstone for complex ideas about the American dream." And it is not all Weegee and freaks and funny rides by a long shot. Sanford Robinson Gifford's 1866 The Beach at Coney Island, among the first depictions of the sandy spit of land, is a dreamlike respite with just a touch of the coming carnival in the distance. From this and a few other early seaside scenes the exhibition moves almost as ra…» More

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Current & Coming | By Barrymore Laurence Scherer

About books

March 16, 2015  |  Recent noteworthy publications that are a pleasure to read and a delight to behold

French Art Deco by Jared Goss (Metropolitan Museum of Art, distr. Yale University Press). 280 pp., color and b/w illus.

As an artistic term, art deco is one of the most misunderstood. “Art Deco is commonly referred to as a ‘style,’ a designation that suggests specific shared characteristics,” observes scholar and former Metropolitan Museum of Art associate curator Jared Goss. “The diversity of expression, however, precludes conceptual unity. More accurate, perhaps, would be ‘movement’ or ‘idiom.’” Goss is by no means the first author to wade into the deco fray, but his focus lends his book distinction. Taking his cue from the Met installation Masterpieces of Art Deco, which he organized, and which was on view from August 2009 through January 2011, he has addressed the subject from the viewpoint of the French works and designers represented in the museum’s own collection.

France is essentially …» More

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[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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