From the editor's desk | By Nicole Anderson

The Magazine ANTIQUES spotted in Soho

September 7, 2016  |  

The Magazine ANTIQUES really covers a lot of ground. Hat tip to Crozier Fine Arts, Inc.

 

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From the editor's desk | By Gregory Cerio

Editor's Letter

September 6, 2016  |  Lately I’ve noticed that fewer and fewer of the e-mails I receive begin with a full salutation. Most notes these days open merely “Greg” or “Gregory.”  The name isn’t preceded by “Dear,” or “Greetings,” or “Hello,” not even a “Hi” or a “Hey.” Maybe the brisk efficiency of digital communication is to blame. Or perhaps it’s an effect of inequality: in tightfisted times, with each of us protecting his or her own withered patch of prosperity, unconsciously we have forgotten about simple courtesy. Whatever the reason for the change, I miss that small gesture of civility represented by the word “Dear,” which, after all, costs nothing more than a few keystrokes.

I mention this peeve not to get on my high horse about etiquette, but by way of introducing myself. I hope it suggests something about the values that will guide my work at this wonderful magazine. I appreciate things—be they good manners or a pair of well-made Windsor chairs—that are time-honored and have been passed along…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Eleanor H. Gustafson

End notes: Welcoming Gregory Cerio

July 21, 2016  |  As we say farewell to Betsy Pochoda, who moves on to her next adventures after eight years at the helm of ANTIQUES, we welcome Gregory Cerio as the new editor. A man of wide-ranging interests and well-chosen words, Greg is no stranger to our office, as he was the founding editor of our sister magazine MODERN and has written for both publications over the years. His answers to our questions below should give readers a fine idea of who he is and why we are delighted to be in his hands moving forward. 

 

 

Tell us a bit about your background and the influences that shaped your interests in art and architecture.

My interest in architecture and the decorative arts came partly by osmosis. My hometown, Annapolis, Maryland, is fortunate to have a powerful and long-established historical preservation society. As a result, I grew up among the finest concentration of eight eenth- and early nineteenthcentury houses and public buildings in the country—as well as the Beaux-Arts piles …» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter

July 11, 2016  |  

It has been something of a long goodbye, my planned departure from these pages, and yet it has taken all of five months to arrive at the right successor. Now we have—Gregory Cerio, an old friend as it happens, whom you will meet on the last page of this issue. We are all pleased. We know Greg as someone with an unyielding faith in the arts of the past and a keen sense of how to give them a lively presence today. 

And so to this, my last outing as editor of ANTIQUES and our annual (mostly) folk art issue, always a favorite of mine. When I started here in February of 2008 I was looking for ways to inject some joy into that sour era of financial collapse and cultural dismay. Folk and outsider art certainly showed me one inviting avenue. I have come to value the way they have liberated art history, opening it to everyday life, relaxing our approach to the sublime in museums, private collections, and especially in this magazine. Pop art did something of the same thing, but folk a…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter, May/June 2016

May 16, 2016  |  Glenn Adamson joins us this month as editor at large with an interesting mandate you can read about below. Glenn was most recently director of the Museum of Arts and Design. Before that he was head of research at the V&A, and curator of the Chipstone Foundation.

The Magazine ANTIQUES: In your column you will think through difficult matters that confront the arts just now, beginning with the problem of ivory. What other issues might interest you?

Glenn Adamson: What interests me most about the column is its timeliness. My plan is to keep an eye on the morning paper, and see what objects from the past come to mind. Right now the refugee issue feels urgent, as does the Black Lives Matter campaign. So those may inspire my next two columns. But I’m also keeping an open mind. 

TMA: Is the column meant to be political?

GA: Yes, but not in a partisan sense. My goal is to find a middle way through the oppositional politics of our time. Historical artifacts are multi valent, textur…» More

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by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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