From the editor's desk | By ANTIQUES Staff

Editor's letter, January/February 2014

January 9, 2014  |  Is it too soon to propose a quota on installations of contempo­rary art in period settings? Yes, I know, everything is mashable these days, but not all these border crossings of present into past deserve a visa. I recently went in search of a silver box in one of the period rooms of a major museum (it wasn't there). What I found instead was a series of interventions by artists who had installed video projections of old movies, recorded interviews with local folk jawing about their relatives, and, for some reason, multiple reproductions of twentieth-century plumbing fixtures. Makes you wonder, who's zooming who?

Not all conjunctions are so cockamamie, and many are simply wonderful. The recent sound instal­lation by Janet Cardiff at the Cloisters in northern Manhattan comes to mind.  There in the twelfth-century remnant of the Fuentiduena Chapel, Cardiff's recording of Thomas Tallis's sixteenth-century motet Spem in alium (In No Other Is My Hope) emerges from forty speakers arra…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's letter, November/December 2013

November 6, 2013  |  Are New Yorkers the most parochial people on the planet? I sometimes think so, especially when it comes to art, where we have an absolute genius for overlooking the important in busy pursuit of The Important. We are a city of zeitgeist sniffers, way too hungry for whatever fad diet the art market is currently dishing out. Luckily our plat du jour gets a lot tastier whenever the Met or the Frick or another city museum brings forth a sensational exhibition with global reach and historical depth, as they frequently do. The glorious Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500-1800 currently at the Met comes to mind.

We have assembled an issue that has little or nothing to do with what is going on in New York...or even with the East Coast for that matter. This may not be a felony but it might qualify as some kind of journalistic misdemeanor in many eyes. You be the judge. I can say with confidence that here on our island we have somehow missed the passion for American art o…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Staff

Michael K. Brown (1953-2013)

September 10, 2013  |  We at ANTIQUES mourn the death of Michael K. Brown, a great friend of the magazine and a cherished member of the American decorative arts family. Our November-December issue will include a tribute to him as a man of enormous kindness, scholarship, humor, and loyalty.

 

 

 

Michael K. Brown (1953-2013), longtime curator of the Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

 

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter, July/August 2013

July 2, 2013  |  Is it so surprising that New York has long been a center for folk and outsider art? From Electra Havemeyer Webb, founder of the Shelburne Museum, who started out in the glossy precincts of Park Avenue in the 1940s to Monty Blanchard, current president of the American Folk Art Museum, whose Tribeca loft is a geyser of the self-taught, the creatively independent, and the unexpected, the city has courted the unorthodox and rewarded variety. Or at least it used to. The imperial crown now sits heavily on New York's head, and the place that is like nowhere else in the world seems bent on becoming like everywhere else. Which brings us to the once small, adventurous, and lovable Museum of Modern Art, now a monolith on West Fifty-Third Street. As the world knows, MoMA plans to rule the street in a vast expanse of glass and steel by demolishing a small gem of twentieth-century architecture, the former home of the American Folk Art Museum. You can turn to our Preservation page to find tha…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's letter, May/June 2013

May 8, 2013  |  

Our cover shows an early and uncharacteristically jaunty paint­ing by George Ault, part of the Lunder Collection featured in the article about the Colby College Museum of Art. Elsewhere in the issue an example of Ault's later, more hard-boiled style can be seen in Marica and Jan Vilcek's collection of 

early American modern­ism. Ault was by most accounts an impossible person who rendered the discouraging reality he perceived around him in his own form of vernacular cubism.  His View from Brooklyn is a favorite of mine.

Not to be too squish-headed about it, but the presence of two George Aults here suggests a kind of karma running through this issue. Not quite intentionally, we have paid tribute in a variety of articles to our peculiarly American form of arts patronage: The Vilceks and their foundation; the Alfond and Lunder families and their gifts to Colby; the arts patrons of Fort Worth who staged a remarkable art exhibition for President and Mrs. Kennedy in their hotel s…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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Martyn Gregory
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The Cooley Gallery
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Philip H. Bradley Co.
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