From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's letter, January/February 2013

January 23, 2013  |  In the 1950s Robert Moses, New York's bully-boy developer (a familiar type in these parts), had a suggestion for citizens who objected when he razed their neighborhoods: "Go to the Rockies," he told them, implying that city life is bulldozers, cranes, and scaffolding and to resist them is to resist being urban and modern.

Moses notwithstanding, modern life in New York has plenty of allure but its pleasures do often seem to me tinged with sadness. The new captivates us even as its undertow is the loss of so many buildings, shops, and streetscapes that were once familiar and dear. For someone caught in the crossfire of these conflicting emotions, certain city landmarks acquire symbolic weight. The Park Avenue Armory, site this month as it has been for many years of the Winter Antiques Show, is, for me, one of them. And not just because it is huge, fairly old...and still here.  

The armory strikes me as a wonderful amalgam of history and modernity, open to transformation and car…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Wendell Garrett (1929-2012)

November 16, 2012  |  We are an extended family here at Antiques and we are mourning our most valued member-the man who gave Americana its voice and our office its warmth.

There will be a celebration of Wendell's life at the Winter Antiques Show on January 28, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. at the Park Avenue Armory in New York City. It will be a joyful occasion. This was a joyful man. 

In addition, a memorial fund in Wendell Garrett’s honor has been established at Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library.  For further information or to make a contribution, please contact Matthew Thurlow, Major Gifts Officer, Winterthur Museum, 5105 Kennett Pike, Winterthur, DE 19735 mthurlow@winterthur.org or 302-888-4878.» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter, November/December 2012

November 6, 2012  |  

Not long ago I planned to have some fun in these pages by running a sly taxonomy of the current television shows about old things-from the somewhat shopworn Antiques Roadshow down through Pawn Stars, American Pickers, Market Warriors and the rest of the Roadshow's offspring. I expected to spare only Storage Wars, which I find the sunniest of guilty pleasures and the most amusing.I know the argument: however demented, these shows bring welcome attention to the field. I don't really buy it. Even the Roadshow, despite its virtues, strikes me as guilty of deforming our appreciation of art and decorative arts by always building to its main event-the "Land sakes alive!" moment routinely squeezed from pilgrims whose treasures have been appraised for those really big sums. Works of art have always been commercial objects, of course, but they are crucially more than that. What a show like Market Warriors does is to sev…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter, September/October 2012

September 4, 2012  |  Our country's regional wars may be over, but in the 1960s when the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) began, they were very much alive. Southern writers for instance were still working through the story of loss while northerners remained dubious about the value of southern culture. MESDA took a different path. The idea that the South did not need to justify itself to the world was a winning strategy for the museum back then, and it continues to be so as MESDA pushes beyond coastal high style into the backcountry of the South as described here by Laura Beach. Nothing undermines a prejudice more effectively than simply ignoring it.

Elsewhere in the South the High Museum of Art in Atlanta has shown another kind of moxie by forming fruitful partnerships with museums in Mexico, Canada, the Netherlands, France, and even New York. Closer to home, as Stephanie Cash explains, the High has taken Hale Woodruff's powerful Talladega murals, restored them, and, along with Tall…» More

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From the editor's desk | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter, July/August 2012

July 31, 2012  |  We have something to celebrate this summer in the resurgence of the American Folk ArtMuseum. Pronounced dead after selling its award-winning building on Fifty-ThirdStreet in Manhattan, the museum is noth­ing of the sort, as you will see in the articles grouped here under the rubric "Folk Art Rising." At its tidy quarters on Lincoln Square, a smooth street-level entrance speeds you to the exhibition Jubilation/Rumination: Life, Real and Imagined, where objects from the collection by quilters, portraitists, and private obses­sives speak to each other in the American vernacular. It is an imaginative pairing of the practical and the visionary curated by Stacy C. Hollander, who joined the museum as an intern and is now as world class as the collection itself.

Looking back in 1933 on the heady years before World War I when she was among the first to discover the work of Picasso and Matisse, Gertrude Stein observed that "once everybody knows they are good the adventure is over." …» More

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NYG 2013

[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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