From the Archives | By Katy Kiick

Independence Day covers by the numbers

July 2, 2014  |  We have published 92 July covers since 1922, and at least twenty-three of them contain allusions to Independence Day.

Some figures:

22:  Number of eagles

9:  Flags

7:  Military men

6:  Indenpendence Day-themed covers in the 1960s, the most of any decade. The 1940s had 5.

3:  Drums

1:  Invitation to buy war bonds

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From the Archives | By ANTIQUES Staff

Valentine's Day by the numbers

February 14, 2014  |  We have published 92 February covers since 1922, and at least fourteen of them contain allusions to Valentine's Day.

 

Some figures

8:  Love birds (four pairs) 1934, 1954, 1956, 1960

7:  Courting couples  1930, 1937, 1953, 1961, 1968, 1994, 2002

6:  The number of times Valentine's Day graced the cover between 1951 and 1961. (The 1930s had four such covers, while the longest space between amorous references was between 1972 and 1994.)

5:  Pink covers 1937, 1956, 1960, 1961, 1972

5:  Appearances by Cupid (putti brethren not included) 1934, 1953, 1956, 1972, 1995

4:  Miscellaneious winged creatures 1961, 1994

1:  Possible breakup cover 2002

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

How America found its face: Portrait miniatures in the New Republic

April 1, 2009  |  By Elle Shushan; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, April 2009.

The stunning events of July 1804 were almost unfathomable for the citizens of the new American republic. One Founding Father had fatally wounded another. Alexander Hamilton was dead and Aaron Burr  would be indicted for murder. The duel and its aftermath marked a turning point in American culture.

Five days before the Burr-Hamilton duel, Edward Greene Malbone arrived for a week's stay in NewYork. Considered the finest miniaturist in the United States, Malbone was attractive, popular, already exceedingly successful, and only twenty-six years old. As Hamilton's massive funeral snaked up Broadway on July 14, he was meeting twenty-five year-old Anson Dickinson for the first time. A fledgling artist, Dickinson had commissioned Malbone to paint his miniature, hoping to learn by watching the more experienced artist at work (Fig. 1).1 So absorbed was Malbone in the painting "that he neither paused himself to view the pagea…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Chinese botanical paintings for the export market

June 1, 2004  |  By Karina H. Corrigan; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, June 2004.

A single stem of chrysanthemum explodes off the page shown in Plate I. This exquisite Chinese export painting was executed abut 1823, two years after this variety of chrysanthemum, the so-called quilled orange, had been introduced into English gardens.1 Chinese plants were first brought to Europe in the late seventeenth century, but ready access to new varieties of Asian species was not widely feasible until the last years of the eighteenth century. Although he never visited  China, Georg Joseph Camel 91661 - 1706), a Moravian Jesuit missionary stationed in the Philippines, collected plants from the Chinese community in Manila to dry and send back to Europe. In honor of Camel's early efforts on behalf of Asian botanical studies, the Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus 9(1707 - 1778) named the Camellia after him. James Cunningham 9d. 1709?), a Scottish East India Company surgeon stationed in Amoy in 1698, became the …» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Reverie on a pair of Japanese screens

July 1, 2001  |  By Michael R. Cunningham; from the Magazine ANTIQUES, July 2001

The idea of landscape in the West has historically been aligned with geography. The appearance of a given earthbound place in a painting or photograph normally initiates for the Western viewer an immediate response of physical orientation. We wish to understand the particular environmental conditions and perhaps the terrain of the place. Using personal experience, we gauge what it might hold in store for the actual-or the imaginary-viewer: its air, light, dampness or dryness, the presence of other beings, and so forth. Customarily, we associate ourselves with being there, feet on the ground, prepared for the elements and the delight or challenge of the site. Even if other, more evanescent qualities-such as light-constitute the central feature of a landscape image, as in some seventeenth-century Dutch paintings, we still inevitably parse the landscape setting in order to orient ourselves topographically so as to…» More

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NYG 2013

[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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