From the Archives | By Archived articles

Children's Mugs

November 13, 2014  |  By Katharine Morrison McClinton; originally published in September 1950.

From time to time Mrs. McClinton contributes a note to ANTIQUES on some intriguing bypath of collecting interest. This one, which offers an appealing approach to nineteenth-century ceramics, will be incorporated in expanded form, in her forthcoming book on antiques, to be published next year by McGraw-Hill.

Nineteenth-century children's mugs have long attracted collectors, but few are perhaps aware of the wide variety of patterns in which these mugs may be found. The collection of pottery mugs formed by Margaret H. Jewell, now on display at the Harrison Gray Otis House in Boston, includes no less than 1200 examples, with hardly a duplicate.

Among the earliest, made before 1840, are mugs decorated simply with a name and inscription, sometimes adding a wreath of leaves. Today these mugs are rare. They were made in canary as well as cream color, with transfer decoration most commonly in black, though other…» More

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

Children's toys: The New-York Historical Society, 200 years

October 31, 2014  |  By Amy a. Weinstein; originally published in January 2005.

Appealing to the imagination of children of all ages, the toy collection of the New-York Historical Society offers a miniature window into nineteenth-century American family life. The approximately three thousand objects that constitute the collection are made of wood, metal, paper, ceramic, and cloth and trace the social, economic, political, and military history of the nation. The collection documents how new toys were created in response to great events and as new materials and technologies were adapted by the European and American toy industries.1 Although the collection most clearly illuminates the leisure pursuits of wealthy and middle-class children, simpler versions of expensive toys made it possible for children living in less privileged circumstances to own toys of their own.

The growing presence of toys in the United States was in part an outgrowth of the emerging recognition of childhood as a special phase…» More

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From the Archives | By Katy Kiick

Independence Day covers by the numbers

July 2, 2014  |  We have published 92 July covers since 1922, and at least twenty-three of them contain allusions to Independence Day.

Some figures:

22:  Number of eagles

9:  Flags

7:  Military men

6:  Indenpendence Day-themed covers in the 1960s, the most of any decade. The 1940s had 5.

3:  Drums

1:  Invitation to buy war bonds

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From the Archives | By ANTIQUES Staff

Valentine's Day by the numbers

February 14, 2014  |  We have published 92 February covers since 1922, and at least fourteen of them contain allusions to Valentine's Day.

 

Some figures

8:  Love birds (four pairs) 1934, 1954, 1956, 1960

7:  Courting couples  1930, 1937, 1953, 1961, 1968, 1994, 2002

6:  The number of times Valentine's Day graced the cover between 1951 and 1961. (The 1930s had four such covers, while the longest space between amorous references was between 1972 and 1994.)

5:  Pink covers 1937, 1956, 1960, 1961, 1972

5:  Appearances by Cupid (putti brethren not included) 1934, 1953, 1956, 1972, 1995

4:  Miscellaneious winged creatures 1961, 1994

1:  Possible breakup cover 2002

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From the Archives | By Archived articles

How America found its face: Portrait miniatures in the New Republic

April 1, 2009  |  By Elle Shushan; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, April 2009.

The stunning events of July 1804 were almost unfathomable for the citizens of the new American republic. One Founding Father had fatally wounded another. Alexander Hamilton was dead and Aaron Burr  would be indicted for murder. The duel and its aftermath marked a turning point in American culture.

Five days before the Burr-Hamilton duel, Edward Greene Malbone arrived for a week's stay in NewYork. Considered the finest miniaturist in the United States, Malbone was attractive, popular, already exceedingly successful, and only twenty-six years old. As Hamilton's massive funeral snaked up Broadway on July 14, he was meeting twenty-five year-old Anson Dickinson for the first time. A fledgling artist, Dickinson had commissioned Malbone to paint his miniature, hoping to learn by watching the more experienced artist at work (Fig. 1).1 So absorbed was Malbone in the painting "that he neither paused himself to view the pagea…» More

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NYG 2013

[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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