The Market | By Carolin C. Young

Masterpiece London 2014

June 24, 2014  |  In the five short years since its creation, Masterpiece has established itself as London's most prominent and antici­pated fair. Its intent is to present the highest caliber art and antiques alongside a wide range of similarly distinguished luxury goods from cars to wine. However, because it was cre­ated by leading dealers from the former Grosvenor House fair, Masterpiece retains decorative arts firmly at its core.

Engraved map of London by Richard Bennett, London, 1760, mounted as a fan on bone sticks with carved ivory end-pieces. Daniel Crouch Rare Books, London.

This year's highlights veer toward unapologetic opulence. Ronald Philips features an astounding Charles II cream-japanned cabinet on a silvered stand; Chiale Antiquariato, a massive carved and inlaid table of 1905, which was made in Turin based on a design by Edoardo Smeriglio; and Anthony Outred, an entire suite of fan­ciful grotto furniture carved in shell forms made in Venice in the second half of the nineteen…» More

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The Market | By Barrymore Laurence Scherer

New collector: Botanical prints

May 21, 2014  |  Although the earliest surviving illustrated botanical manuscript dates from AD 512-the Vienna Dioscurides, a copy of the important medical treatise by the first-century Greek physician and herbalist Pedanius Dioscurides-botanical illustration as a distinctive artistic genre developed in the fifteenth century with the rise of illustrated herbals, manuscripts explaining the medicinal and culinary uses of plants and flowers. After all, in an age living close to the ground, it was crucial to distinguish between a plant that could induce sleep and one that would induce it forever. The introduc­tion of exotic new plants from Asia and the Americas during the sixteenth century prompted continuous pub­lication of accurate pictures to help botanists study, name, and classify the new discoveries. Continued refine­ments to reproductive engraving and lithographic techniques furthered these publications during the eigh­teenth and nineteenth centuries. Most techniques produced black-and-white…» More

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The Market | By ANTIQUES Staff

Talking antiques at the Philadelphia Antiques Show

April 24, 2014  |  We asked exhibitors at the Philadelphia Antiques Show to highlight one exceptional object in their booths and describe it as they might to an interested collector. Here are the things they chose, along with some of their comments.

 

Arthur Guy Kaplan

Nothing evokes spring and the promise of summer like butterflies flitting around the garden. From ancient times to the present, bejeweled figural jewelry of insects and birds has amused and intrigued us, and every major jeweler from around the world has delighted their clients with whimsical jewels of the flit­ting, creeping, and crawling. Our "garden" at the Philadelphia Antiques Show will include a selec­tion of butterflies, bees, birds, and snakes-as well as flowers.

 

Avery Galleries

The paintings of fashionably dressed and elegantly posed women at leisure by Irving Ramsey Wiles (1861-1948) were as popular during his lifetime as they are today. These "esprit portraits," as Charles H. Caffin wrote in 1907, combined the tec…» More

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The Market | By ANTIQUES Staff

The ADA's 1st online antiques show

March 31, 2014  |  Please go to the web site for the Antique Dealers of America's first online antiques show (adadealers.com), a three day round the clock event that lets you shop in your pajamas, guarantees authenticity, offers stuff exclusive to its venue, provides for buyer's remorse, and eliminates the pre-show wheeling dealing that allows dealers to pick off each other's stuff before you get to see it. To these and all the other inducements on the site we add four of our own:

1.  The online show might just be the step into the 21st century that the venerable organization has needed.

2.  The show's web page is well designed, lively, and convincing, another auspicious sign.

3.  You can buy but not with one click. Once you decide on an item you still have to contact the dealer and schmooze, an irreplaceable part of the charm of buying, selling, and collecting antiques and fine art.

4.  It might just work, and if it does we are betting that by creating an energetic force field around antique…» More

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The Market | By Laura Beach

Seen and Heard

March 19, 2014  |  ART FAIR OVERLOAD?

With the show season in full swing, "collectors are heading into the fray this year with a serious case of art-fair overload," Kelly Crow posits in the Wall Street Journal here and here.

Crow says "at least 200 large fairs now jam the art-world calendar-complete with attendant parties and smaller satellite fairs in tow." Before anyone could actually ponder the consequences of perpetual motion it was time to be off again, from the Art Fair and the Armory Show in New York to the European Fine Art Fair (TEFAF) in Maastricht, The Netherlands, then back to NewYork for Asia Week, all in the space of two weeks in March.

TEFAF STARTS STRONG...

Preliminary reports are in for the European Fine Art Fair, which organizers say attracted over 10,000 private and institutional collectors from around the world for the most successful opening day in its history.  The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired a c. 1690 parcel-gilt ostrich ewer and basin from J. Kugel Antiquaires…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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Ronald Phillips
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The Stanley Weiss Collection
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Martyn Gregory
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