The Market | By Editorial staff

Dramatic Encounters at the 2016 Biennale des Antiquaires

September 16, 2016  |  There was an air of confident renewal at this year’s Biennale des Antiquaires, the grand and sophisticated Paris showcase for art, antiques, jewelry, and antiquities which, despite its name, will become an annual event next year under a new name to be announced in October.

A dramatic wood figure from Yimam, circa 1650, at the booth of Galerie Meyer. Photo by Marisa Bartolucci.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This was the first time in a number of years that the big jewelry houses weren’t present. In recent editions, the size of their booths had grown so large and lavish that they eclipsed the displays of the antiquaires. While haute joailleries was still on show, this time represented by smaller, younger, far more edgy, but just as luxe houses, the accent was back on the art, antiques, and antiquities, with more Old Masters paintings and drawings displayed than ever before, now that Paris Tableau, a fair specializing in that category merged with this edition of the Biennale. The resul…» More

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The Market | By Glenn Adamson

Critical Thinking: Confederate Flags and Monuments

July 26, 2016  |  There’s trouble on Monument Avenue. This grand boulevard in Richmond, Virginia, is the symbolic heart of the city. It is leafy and quiet, and lined with grand architecture dating largely from the early twentieth century. As its name suggests, it also features a series of monuments. One is dedicated to the tennis player Arthur Ashe. All the others pay tribute to the leaders of the Confederacy—and that, of course, is where the problem comes in. 

Confederate symbols, particularly the “Stars and Bars” battle flag, have become extremely controversial. The  flash point was the tragic shooting in Charleston, South Carolina, in which nine African Americans were killed by a white supremacist. Across the South, activists demanded that Confederate imagery be removed from government flagpoles and from license plates. Many governors (including Terry McAuliffe of Virginia) concurred. For most Americans this seemed the right decision, and a long overdue one. Given that the Confederacy fought…» More

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The Market | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Mount Vernon Comes to Freeman's

March 9, 2016  |  Despite its dainty name the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association is not an outfit to be trifled with. Nor is it one to do anything by half measures. Founded in 1858, it is comprised of twenty-seven members, each representing a state in the union at that time, who approached and still approach the project of preserving George Washington’s estate with an almost military rigor. Mount Vernon was virtually empty when the association was formed; the members set about furnishing it by having the representative from each state adopt a room. In 1858 these representatives were the wives and daughters of powerful politicians, jurists, and cultural figures, and thus well positioned to locate and donate important objects. Alice Mary Longfellow, for instance, daughter of the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, located George Washington’s desk and brought it back to the estate, where it remains today. 

Mount Vernon Ladies Association Council of 1884. All photographs courtesy of the Mount …

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The Market | By Barrymore Laurence Scherer

New collector: Spratling silver

July 28, 2014  |  The son of Dr. William P. Spratling, a celebrated neurologist and pioneer in treating epilepsy, William Spratling had a tragic childhood, losing his mother and a sister when he was ten, and his father five years later. He went on to Auburn University in Alabama, where he majored in architecture and was apparently teaching the subject there within two years of his arrival. At twenty-one he became an associate professor of architecture at Tulane University in New Orleans, and during the ensuing years he also wrote on architecture and related subjects for Scribner's Magazine, the Journal of the American Institute of Architects, and other publications.

His personal charm, his intellectual abilities, and his writing (he was eventually the author of eight books including an autobiography) gained him entrée into literary circles, where he forged close friendships with such luminaries as Sherwood Anderson, John Dos Passos, and William Faulkner. Faulkner and Spratling lived together …» More

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The Market | By Carolin C. Young

Masterpiece London 2014

June 24, 2014  |  In the five short years since its creation, Masterpiece has established itself as London's most prominent and antici­pated fair. Its intent is to present the highest caliber art and antiques alongside a wide range of similarly distinguished luxury goods from cars to wine. However, because it was cre­ated by leading dealers from the former Grosvenor House fair, Masterpiece retains decorative arts firmly at its core.

Engraved map of London by Richard Bennett, London, 1760, mounted as a fan on bone sticks with carved ivory end-pieces. Daniel Crouch Rare Books, London.

This year's highlights veer toward unapologetic opulence. Ronald Philips features an astounding Charles II cream-japanned cabinet on a silvered stand; Chiale Antiquariato, a massive carved and inlaid table of 1905, which was made in Turin based on a design by Edoardo Smeriglio; and Anthony Outred, an entire suite of fan­ciful grotto furniture carved in shell forms made in Venice in the second half of the nineteen…» More

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by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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