The Market  |  By Staff

This week's top lots

February 5, 2010  |  
What:
L'Homme qui marche I by Alberto Giacometti, 1960
Where:
Sotheby's London (February 3, Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale)
Estimate:
£12-18 million
Sold For:
£65 million

Fetching $104.3 million, Giacometti's iconic 6-foot tall sculpture set a new world record price for a work of art at auction (previously held by Picasso's Garçon à la pipe, which sold for $104.2 million in 2004). The cast bronze sculpture of a wiry male figure was the first of two versions made for an outdoor installation at the Chase Manhattan Plaza but never completed. A cast of the sculpture was exhibited at the Venice Biennale in 1962.

What: Anne de Clèves, d'après Hans Holbein le Jeune by Edgar Degas, c.1860-62
Where: Christie's London (February 3, Impressionist/Modern Day Sale)
Estimate:
£80,000 - £120,000
Sold For:
£169,250

This unusual Degas painting is based on Hans Holbein's 1593 portrait of Anne of Cleves, which hangs at the Louvre. Holbein was commissioned to paint Anne and her sister for Henry VIII's consideration in choosing a fourth wife. The king was reportedly disappointed when Anne arrived to be wed, suggesting that he had been misled by the portrait, and shortly after he had their marriage annulled. Degas made his version of Holbein's portrait early in his career when he frequently studied at the Louvre. He reportedly produced more than 700 copies of master paintings though very few survive today.

What:
Citrine and diamond brooch by Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co.
Where:
Sotheby's New York (February 3, Important Jewels)
Estimate:
$15,000-20,000
Sold For:
$26,250


The design of this charming brooch from the collection of novelist Danielle Steel is Schlumberger's popular "Bird on a Rock" setting, which was created in the 1960s and later used to mount the famed "Tiffany Diamond"—the 128.54 carat South African yellow diamond that Charles Tiffany acquired in 1878, and which remains on view at Tiffany's Fifth Avenue showroom.

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