The Market | By ANTIQUES Staff

Talking antiques: Winter Antiques Show

January 9, 2014  |  We asked exhibitors at the Winter Antiques Show to highlight one exceptional object in their booths and describe it as they might to an interested collector. Here are the things they chose, along with some of their comments.

Allan Katz

Edward or Edvard Olson, the carver of this Uncle Sam that dates from about 1925, was born in Sweden in 1887. After coming to the United States he worked for twenty-four years as a machinist at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington. The carving of Uncle Sam comes with a period photo­graph showing Olson at work carving a small horse alongside his Uncle Sam.

 

 

 

 

Aronson Antiquairs

Several months ago we got a telephone call from a Dutch notary. The notary asked if I remembered a certain lady for whom we had done an evaluation fifteen years ago. As I did remember her, I was asked to make an appointment at the notary's office. Once there he explained that my late father was mentioned in her will. She so appreciated our k…» More

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The Market | By ANTIQUES Staff

Exhibition openings

December 16, 2013  |  December 18

"Decisive Moments: Photographs from the Collection of Cheyre R. and James F. Pierce"; Honolulu Museum of Art, Honolulu, HI

"The American West in Bronze, 1850-1925"; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

December 20

"‘Workt by Hand': Hidden Labor and Historical Quilts"; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.  

Bars quilt, circa 1890, Pennsylvania. Cotton, wool. Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. H. Peter Findlay,photograph by Gavin Ashworth, on view at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.

December 21

"The Netherlandish Miniature, 1260-1550"; Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH

December 22

"The Age of Impressionism: Great French Paintings from the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute"; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX

January 15

"100 Works for 100 Years: A Centennial Celebration"; MontclairArt Museum, NJ

"Venice: The Golden Age of Art and Music"; Portland Art Museum, OR

January 16

"History's Shado…» More

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The Market | By ANTIQUES Staff

On the money

October 21, 2013  |  By Laura Beach

Yorkshire calendar and almanac

Calendar and almanac, probably York or Ripon, Yorkshire, England, c. 1425. Ink, tempera, and gold leaf on parchment, each page 6 by 4 1/8 inches.

WHY:  Priced in the six figures by Les Enluminures of Paris, New York, and Chicago, this calendar and almanac of about 1425, with prognostications in Latin, illustrates the English monarchy from William I to Henry VI and depicts the history of the world from Adam's creation to St. Thomas Becket and Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, beheaded in 1322. Renderings of local saints suggest a Yorkshire origin for this gilt- and tempera-embellished ink on parchment document, which notes solar and lunar eclipses and predicts events such as the harvest, disasters, and war. The work sold to a collector at Masterpiece London.

TAKEAWAY: "This manuscript testifies to the emergence of a class of private book owners, among them prosperous landowners and country doctors, in northern England at a time when the…» More

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The Market | By Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser

John Trumbull's portrait of Alexander Hamilton

September 9, 2013  |  A full-length portrait by the celebrated Revolutionary-era painter John Trumbull of Alexander Hamilton, then secretary of the treasury under President George Washington, has joined the permanent collections of both the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, thanks to a gift from the painting's former owner, the global wealth manager and investment bank Credit Suisse. Each institution owns a half share of Portrait of Alexander Hamilton, which is currently on view in the new American Galleries at the Metropolitan Museum. In subsequent years, the museums will each exhibit the painting for a two-year period. As the greatest known portrait of Hamilton and one of the finest civic portraits from the Federal period, the painting is a splendid addition to both collections and demonstrates how institutions can enrich access to art by working together.

In December 1791 a committee of five New York mer­chants, some of whom were members of the recently found…» More

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The Market | By Elizabeth Pochoda

Editor's Letter, September/October 2013

September 9, 2013  |  
Like most editors I am interested in everything, but that doesn't mean I don't have opinions. I have, in fact, far too many of them, so I like it when some of my prejudices get rearranged, as they were early last spring when Eleanor Gustafson and I visited the Philadelphia home of John Whitenight and Frederick LaValley featured here. Ten rooms with aesthetic movement furniture, two hundred glass parlor domes, automata of a smoking monkey and a Renaissance nobleman strumming a mandolin, rare conservatory plants, and other Victoriana? Deeply cuckoo I figured. I was wrong. 

All great collecting is, I think, a form of autobiography, and the more sincere it is, the more suc­cessful. "No one lives like this anymore," a friend said when I showed him my snapshots of the rooms. Also wrong. No one ever lived like this, and that is exactly what won me over. I admire everything about the Whitenight-LaValley house, but what I love most is its boldness and sincer­ity-the take it or leave it…» More

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NYG 2013

[Compiled by Bill Stern, Executive Director at the Museum of California Design, Los Angeles. Originally published in "Curator's Eye" in Modern Magazi

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