Your search for "" returned 1655 entries.

Type

Posted 01/20/12

Ahead of the curve: The Newark Museum now and then

In a better world we would all be thronging the doors of the Newark Museum; in the best of worlds Ulysses Grant Dietz would be there to meet us, taking us through the galleries with fellow curators Christa Clarke and Katherine Anne Paul

ARTICLE

Posted 01/21/16

What we talk about when we talk about naive art

Late in the 1970s, sailing in the Grenadines, my wife Brigitte and I stopped at the small island of Bequia—an Arawak name meaning “is­land of the clouds.” It has now become a tourist stop. Port Elizabeth, its principal town, today advertises a “charming wa­terfront; take a stroll from the vegetable market, follow ‘front street’ with its many shops, boutiques and restaurants, keep going along the beach walkway, maybe stop for a drink at the Frangipani or Gingerbread.” Passing time has not erased the memory of walking that waterfront, stopping in the manner of meandering tourists at a stationer’s shop and coming upon, piled in a bin, a small stack of paintings by Canute Caliste, six dollars apiece. We bought them all.  

ARTICLE

Posted 01/21/16

OMG Indeed!

It was quiet in the galleries last September as I took a final walk through the Wadsworth Atheneum before the grand unveiling of our eight-year project to bring back its glories. I wondered how our members, patrons, the press, and the public would respond to all that we have done here. It has been a long haul, full of ups and downs in the economically stressed city of Hartford, Connecticut, as we renovated and upgraded the museum’s aged buildings so that its world-class collections could be reinstalled.

ARTICLE

Posted 01/14/16

Editor's Letter, January/February 2016

We occasionally split the run of an issue of ANTIQUES with one cover for subscribers—an interior from Abbeville, Louisiana, in this case—and another for distribution at shows—Louis Lozowick’s 1930 lithograph of the Brooklyn Bridge. If this sounds like a North/South thing it isn’t exactly, but I’ll explain that in a moment.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 01/05/16

New Worlds, New Art

Landscape painting in all the Americas, a touring exhibition and an inquiry Artistic representation of human interaction with the land has a long history in the Americas. It spans more than thirty thousand years, from the earthworks and pictographs of ancient indigenous cultures to the land art of the 1960s and 1970s to contemporary photographs of the terrible beauty of environmental destruction. It was during the early years of the nineteenth century, as emerging settler nations across the hemisphere gained and asserted their independence, that landscape painting began to forge a broader vision of the Americas. Artists seeking to respond to and depict distinctive topographies and natural wonders produced unique pictorial representations that nonetheless shared an ideological and aesthetic orientation to the land, as well as artistic techniques for depicting it.

ARTICLE

Posted 12/18/15

A Rich and Beautiful Sadness

In one of his most famous works, the esteemed art historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner sought to define “The Englishness of English Art.” If anyone were to under take a comparable inquiry into the Danishness of Danish art, the painter Vilhelm Hammershøi could well stand as the palmary embodiment of the thing in question. His small, reticent, manically controlled paintings achieve that prim order, that almost morbid inwardness, that foreigners, at least, are apt to associate with the land of Hamlet and Kierkegaard.

ARTICLE
NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 12/07/15

Still Startling, Still Electric

Julia Margaret Cameron was almost twenty-four when Louis-Jacques-Mondé Daguerre announced the invention of photography at the Académie des Sciences in Paris in 1839. But it wasn’t until she was forty-eight—another lifetime later—that she would fully take up the medium herself. The catalyst was a Christmas gift from her daughter Julia and Julia’s husband in 1863.

ARTICLE

Posted 12/07/15

Editor's Letter, November/December 2015

It would be tempting to wiggle into this one, introduce the issue with some high minded talk about the past not being another country and so forth, go on to mention our wonderful articles about Julia Margaret Cameron, etc., but more about all of that in a minute…The fact is we have something here requiring immediate comment—Paul Kossey’s discovery of a set of drawings done in 1945 quite probably by Schenley High School in Pittsburgh’s most famous graduate, Andy Warhol. 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 12/04/15

Art Brut in New York

The American Folk Art Museum is now mounting Art Brut in America: The Incursion of Jean Dubuffet. The two hundred works are drawn from Dubuffet’s vast collection in the Collection de l’Art Brut in Lausanne, Switzerland.

NEWS &
OPINION
Thank you for signing up.
NYG 2013