Your search for "150" returned 128 entries.

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Posted 01/20/12

Ahead of the curve: The Newark Museum now and then

In a better world we would all be thronging the doors of the Newark Museum; in the best of worlds Ulysses Grant Dietz would be there to meet us, taking us through the galleries with fellow curators Christa Clarke and Katherine Anne Paul

ARTICLE

Posted 01/12/17

Compass Points

The man who brought together the furniture and works of art in two Texas homes takes inspiration from several directions.  

ARTICLE

Posted 01/11/17

Revisiting The Art of the Common Man

The exhibition American Folk Art: The Art of the Common Man in America, 1750–1900 was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City from November 30, 1932, through January 14, 1933. Presenting American folk art as part of a continuous artistic tradition reaching back to the eighteenth century, it was the most comprehensive, illuminating display of the subject held up to that time.

ARTICLE

Posted 01/11/17

Growing Interests: Expanding the collections at the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum

In 1926 John D. Rockefeller Jr. formally embarked on the project that would become the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation by purchasing Philip Ludwell's house of about 1775 on Duke of Gloucester Street. That acquisition, the first "antique" in Colonial Williamsburg's collection, came to play a pivotal role in the founding of what would eventually be the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum. 

ARTICLE

Posted 07/08/16

The substance of remembering: A collector's quest

Can there be more than one Robert Hicks operating out of a cabin called “Labor in Vain” somewhere near Nashville, Tennessee? You might be forgiven for thinking so. The Robert Hicks whose essay appears below is also a best-selling novelist (The Widow of the South, A Separate Country, and the forthcoming The Orphan Mother); a former music publisher and artist manager for a range of genres, from country to alt rock; a maker of award-winning, hair-raising small batch bourbon; a preservationist whose focus is on Civil War sites, including the battlefield at Franklin, Tennessee; and a collector of southern material culture with a unique sense of what collecting can mean in the South. 

ARTICLE

Posted 06/17/16

Local color, global appeal

Three New Orleans museums and two community cultural institutions draw visitors from afar by keeping the focus on indigenous artistry.  

ARTICLE

Posted 06/17/16

Dennis Miller, Helen Keller, Bunker

Is it just me or is Dennis Miller Bunker's painting Wild Asters more than beautiful (Fig. 1)? The blue stream rushes under us, grasses bending in the current, and the streamside bushes spray on either bank. The natural world is so near, we can hear and smell it-the trill of the water and the scent of the asters and grass and even of the sun.

ARTICLE

Posted 05/16/16

Editor's Letter, May/June 2016

Glenn Adamson joins us this month as editor at large with an interesting mandate you can read about below. Glenn was most recently director of the Museum of Arts and Design. Before that he was head of research at the V&A, and curator of the Chipstone Foundation.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 12/07/15

Still Startling, Still Electric

Julia Margaret Cameron was almost twenty-four when Louis-Jacques-Mondé Daguerre announced the invention of photography at the Académie des Sciences in Paris in 1839. But it wasn’t until she was forty-eight—another lifetime later—that she would fully take up the medium herself. The catalyst was a Christmas gift from her daughter Julia and Julia’s husband in 1863.

ARTICLE

Posted 11/16/15

Andy Warhol's Pittsburgh

Collecting and researching American art have been avocations of mine since my student days at the University of Pittsburgh in the 1950s, when I commuted to school through the neighborhoods of the Hill District and past the belching steel mills on both sides of the Monongahela River. Those are fond memories still—fifty years after leaving Pittsburgh for New England—so when a group of ten drawings of those neighborhoods and mills surfaced on eBay, with inscriptions dating to March 1945 by a student at the city's Schenley High School, I acquired them. My reasons were initially nostalgic, but I also wondered if research might show that the "Andy" on the first sketch could possibly be Andy Warhol, who graduated from Schenley High in 1945.

ARTICLE