Your search for "150" returned 118 entries.

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Posted 01/20/12

Ahead of the curve: The Newark Museum now and then

In a better world we would all be thronging the doors of the Newark Museum; in the best of worlds Ulysses Grant Dietz would be there to meet us, taking us through the galleries with fellow curators Christa Clarke and Katherine Anne Paul

ARTICLE

Posted 07/30/15

Disturbers of the Peace

One sign of an important exhibition may be its ability to move us into unfamiliar territory. By that measure, as by others, the recent show at the American Folk Art Museum, When the Curtain Never Comes Down, has claimed our attention. Its twenty-seven self-taught/outsider artists are represented by both permanent works— assemblages, garments, instruments, drawings, and the like—but more significantly by their actions in movement, song, and other forms of evanescent self-display. In the current art climate it is a relief to encounter art that for the most part cannot be bought or sold. But surely we are drawn to these evangelists of the self for other, deeper reasons

ARTICLE

Posted 07/30/15

High tops and low

Among the contents of the Allen Ginsberg Papers in Stanford University’s Green Library is a pair of worn and dirty tennis shoes. In the thousand linear feet of correspondence, photographs, manuscripts and notes, reel-to-reel recordings, performance posters, and broadsides, the beat-up sneakers hold their own. Purchased during his 1965 visit to Czechoslovakia, it is reasonable to surmise that Ginsberg wore the nondescript white canvas shoes to march in Prague’s May Day parade, to address a throng of students in the city square, and to cross the tarmac to an outbound plane when he was expelled from the Communist country a few days later

ARTICLE

Posted 05/22/15

Figures in a landscape: sculpture in the British garden

No English country-house garden would be complete without the well-placed statue erminating a vista--Thomas Gray's "storied urn and animated bust"1 --giving a classical and literary reference to the landscape and subtly humanizing the wildness of nature. The origin of this, as of so many other aspects of British garden design, can be traced to sixteenth-century Italy

ARTICLE

Posted 04/13/15

The jeweled watches of Henry Blank and Company of Newark

Like most nineteenth- and early twentieth-century jewelry manufacturers in Newark, New Jersey, Henry Blank and Company until recently had been long forgotten. However, it was one of the largest and most successful Newark firms from the 1890s until well after World War II

ARTICLE

Posted 03/31/15

Seventeenth-century French enameled watches in the Walters Art Gallery

In his book Old Clocks and Watches and their Makers, F. J. Britten notes that "watches with enamel painting before 1640 are exceedingly rare, and there is a marked difference in the character of such decorative work executed at the beginning, compared with that done during the later years of the seventeenth century." This article was originally published in the December 1963 issue of ANTIQUES. 

ARTICLE

Posted 03/16/15

About books

Recent noteworthy publications that are a pleasure to read and a delight to behold

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 02/24/15

Prince Demah Barnes: Portraitist and slave in colonial Boston

At first glance, the small oil portrait of a handsome man in a flowered dressing gown looked somewhat unprepossessing. Hanging on the wall of a dealer’s booth at an antiques show in 2010, it had a “folksy” appeal, but wasn’t an obvious candidate for acquisition by the Metropolitan Museum of Art

ARTICLE

Posted 10/31/14

Schoolgirl needlework at the Morven Museum

Through March 29, 2015

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 10/31/14

Children's toys: The New-York Historical Society, 200 years

The growing presence of toys in the United States was in part an outgrowth of the emerging recognition of childhood as a special phase of life, separate from adulthood 

NEWS &
OPINION
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Where to Go in Summer 2015: A Must-Read Guide for Artistic Summer Destinations i