Your search for "150" returned 106 entries.

Type

Posted 11/06/12

Editor's Letter, November/December 2012

Works of art have always been commercial objects, but they are crucially more than that...

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 09/04/12

Beyond moonlight and magnolias

"We would have lost so much in the way of regional history and artifacts had MESDA not undertaken this project when it did."

ARTICLE

Posted 05/09/12

The Kaufman Collection: The pursuit of excellence and a gift to the nation

In my catalogue of friends, mentors, scholars, and collectors, Linda Ha. and the late George M. Kaufman fill all the roles...

ARTICLE

Posted 01/01/12

Hudson River Classics: Edgewater and Richard Hampton Jenrette

Jenrette-who in 1993 established the Classical American Homes Preservation Trust to promote six historic properties between New York and Saint Croix that he restored and opened to the public-even h

ARTICLE

Posted 01/01/12

Winter Antiques Show 2012

We asked exhibitors at the Winter Antiques Show to highlight one exceptional object in their booths and describe it as they might to an interested collector. Here are the things they chose, along with some of their comments.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 09/26/11

The Japanesque silver of the Whiting Manufacturing Company

The 1870s and 1880s were some of the most innovative and exciting decades in the history of the American silver industry. Postwar prosperity, the discovery of silver in the American West, and innovations in manufacturing created an ideal environment for the design and fashioning of original objects.

ARTICLE

Posted 07/21/11

Fortunate Son: Reading the memoirs of Albert Sack

"I was a good student up through 6th grade but then my priorities became play, friends, and girls. Mother kept a beautiful home. Dad was prosperous in carving out his career which interested me not at all."

ARTICLE

Posted 01/01/11

George Ault and 1940s America

What does it mean for an artist to make a world?  Consider the case of George Ault, and more especially of Black Night: Russell’s Corners (Fig. 1), a painting he made in 1943 in Woodstock, New York, where he moved in 1937 and lived until his death eleven years later.

ARTICLE

Posted 07/01/10

History in towns: Bristol Rhode Island

Contumacious individualists, Rhode Island’s settlers did not often organize formal settlements on the Puritan model; Bristol is the finest exception. If it today retains so much of its character and scale, it is because the geometric logic of its plan remained appropriate. Thames Street served the physical functions of theharbor, Hope the commercial, and High the civic. The result is one of the most enduring and successful essays of Puritan town planning, here in a maritime setting.—William H. Jordy1

ARTICLE

Posted 04/17/10

The African perspective in Detroit

The Detroit Institute of Arts is presenting a fascinating and adventurous exhibition that explores the consequences on African art of cultural exchanges between Africa and Europe over the past five hundred years. Casting the European as the cultural “other,” a reversal of the usual Eurocentric perspective, the exhibition examines how African artists from diverse cultures used, and continue to use, visual forms to reflect their particular societies’ changing attitudes toward Europeans, as the latter evolved from stranger to colonizer, to the more inclusive Westerner.

NEWS &
OPINION
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NYG 2013