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Posted 01/20/12

Ahead of the curve: The Newark Museum now and then

In a better world we would all be thronging the doors of the Newark Museum; in the best of worlds Ulysses Grant Dietz would be there to meet us, taking us through the galleries with fellow curators Christa Clarke and Katherine Anne Paul

ARTICLE

Posted 11/29/16

Dealers' Choice: The noteworthy art collection of gallerists Abbot and Marcia Vose of Boston goes on display

The term "old school" could almost have been invented to describe the Vose Galleries, that venerable Boston art institution now celebrating its 175th year in business. In honor of that almost unprecedented milestone for an art gallery, the two owners, Abbot "Bill" and Marcia Vose, who have been married for forty-four years, have decided to put on display a selection of their private collection of American impressionists, assembled over the past four decades, as part of an exhibition titled Crosscurrents: The Colonies, Clubs & Schools That Established Impressionism in America.

ARTICLE

Posted 11/18/16

On books: Republic of Taste: Art, Politics, and Everyday Life in Early America by Catherine E. Kelly

Artists and writers in eighteenth-century America, eager to craft a democratic culture distinct from that of Europe, but nonetheless notable for its refinement, elevated the idea of “taste” as an index of character and national virtue. This was not a populist project, but it reached into everyday life through the efforts of the people Catherine Kelly calls “aesthetic entrepreneurs,” who painted portraits, disseminated prints, opened museums, and produced banners and memorabilia to draw the multitudes into a patriotic festival of right-minded taste.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 11/16/16

An old master, newly arrived: Valentin de Boulogne at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

A rather depressing article appeared recently in the New York Times concerning a steep and sudden decline in the market for old master paintings. "At a time when contemporary art is all the rage among collectors, viewers, and donors," Robin Pogrebin wrote, "many experts are questioning whether old master artwork—once the most coveted—can stay relevant at auction houses, galleries, and museums." There can be a no more thunderous rebuttal to the notion that old masters are irrelevant than the new exhibition of Valentin de Boulogne at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

ARTICLE

Posted 11/16/16

The American Art Fair returns

The ninth edition of this elegant fall showcase will fill the top three floors of the 1896 Renaissance revival style Bohemian National Hall on Manhattan’s Upper East Side with stock from seventeen top-tier art galleries. 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 11/15/16

Small European exhibitions with a big punch

Clara Peeters was among the first and most accomplished painters to specialize in food-laden still lifes, replete with cheese and delicate biscuits, candy, and nuts as well as ornate vessels and floral bouquets. Revered especially for her playful use of light and reflection—for example her own distorted portrait shown on the polished surface of a gilded covered cup—the artist nevertheless remains a mysterious figure.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 11/09/16

Caffeinated culture in Detroit

 The Detroit Institute of Arts has organized a delightful and illuminating exhibition that explores the myriad ramifications that coffee, tea, and chocolate had on European culture.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 11/08/16

From specimens to souls: The evolution of early portrait photography at the Cleveland Museum of Art

Every photographic portrait confers on its subject some degree of immortality. We take for granted the ability to know what a person looks like, since images of family, friends, and famous strangers dead and alive are at our fingertips through a Google Images or Facebook search. But until 1839 only the wealthy could have a likeness recorded, share it with others, and leave it behind for future generations.

ARTICLE

Posted 11/08/16

The ancien regime’s master of precious metals: Celebrating Pierre Gouthiere at the Frick

This month the Frick opens Pierre Gouthière: Virtuoso Gilder at the French Court, the first show devoted to the work in gilded metal—traditionally called bronze d'oré in French—by an artist whose achievements placed him among the finest French masters of the eighteenth century.

ARTICLE

Posted 11/08/16

Blakelock is back at Questroyal

Brilliance and madness; poverty and fame—the life of Ralph Albert Blakelock (1847–1919) forms one of the more fascinating chapters in the history of American art.

NEWS &
OPINION
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