Your search for "2" returned 1022 entries.

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Posted 01/20/12

Ahead of the curve: The Newark Museum now and then

In a better world we would all be thronging the doors of the Newark Museum; in the best of worlds Ulysses Grant Dietz would be there to meet us, taking us through the galleries with fellow curators Christa Clarke and Katherine Anne Paul

ARTICLE

Posted 01/12/17

Compass Points

The man who brought together the furniture and works of art in two Texas homes takes inspiration from several directions.  

ARTICLE

Posted 01/11/17

Revisiting The Art of the Common Man

The exhibition American Folk Art: The Art of the Common Man in America, 1750–1900 was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City from November 30, 1932, through January 14, 1933. Presenting American folk art as part of a continuous artistic tradition reaching back to the eighteenth century, it was the most comprehensive, illuminating display of the subject held up to that time.

ARTICLE

Posted 01/11/17

Growing Interests: Expanding the collections at the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum

In 1926 John D. Rockefeller Jr. formally embarked on the project that would become the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation by purchasing Philip Ludwell's house of about 1775 on Duke of Gloucester Street. That acquisition, the first "antique" in Colonial Williamsburg's collection, came to play a pivotal role in the founding of what would eventually be the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum. 

ARTICLE

Posted 01/10/17

Calamity and catharsis in Maine

Flood, fire, earthquake, drought...few things capture the collective imagination more than the subject of disaster.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 01/10/17

Praiseworthy Percier at the Bard Graduate Center

The name of Charles Percier has for so long been linked with that of his collaborator and partner, Pierre François Fontaine, most notably for their Recueil de décorations intérieures, that the breadth of his individual accomplishments and talents as revealed in the current exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center is a bit mind­boggling. 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 01/09/17

Making it Two Authors

Despite our best efforts to be accurate, on the rare occasion something slips through the cracks. 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 01/06/17

Missing pieces

Scholars hope to reunite all thirty paintings in Jacob Lawrence's Struggle series, his epic of early American history. But the whereabouts of several panels is unknown.

ARTICLE

Posted 01/05/17

How we see refugees, yesterday and today

In April 1914 the Modernist Studios in New York City held an “Exposition of Bad Taste.” Wallpaper patterns that had been popular in the 1880s served as the backdrop for a crowded display comprising “marble-topped furniture, seaweed, wax flowers, and other treasures under glass; samplers, homemade paintings, ornate chinaware of every description, and countless articles such as were considered extremely genteel in the old days.” 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 01/04/17

What Picasso inspired in Prague: The brief, bold flourishing of Czech cubist design and architecture

The zigzag angles, the break in the line of a chair leg, or the dark stained wood immediately attract your attention to Czech cubist furniture. Each wooden element is beveled into the planes of a prism, resulting in the unique designs produced during a few brief years before World War I in what is now the Czech Republic.

ARTICLE