Your search for "3" returned 907 entries.

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Posted 01/20/12

Ahead of the curve: The Newark Museum now and then

In a better world we would all be thronging the doors of the Newark Museum; in the best of worlds Ulysses Grant Dietz would be there to meet us, taking us through the galleries with fellow curators Christa Clarke and Katherine Anne Paul

ARTICLE

Posted 07/21/16

End notes: Welcoming Gregory Cerio

As we say farewell to Betsy Pochoda, who moves on to her next adventures after eight years at the helm of ANTIQUES, we welcome Gregory Cerio as the new editor. 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 07/11/16

Editor's Letter

It has been something of a long goodbye, my planned departure from these pages, and yet it has taken all of five months to arrive at the right successor. Now we have—Gregory Cerio, an old friend as it happens, whom you will meet on the last page of this issue. We are all pleased. We know Greg as someone with an unyielding faith in the arts of the past and a keen sense of how to give them a lively presence today. 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 07/08/16

The substance of remembering: A collector's quest

Can there be more than one Robert Hicks operating out of a cabin called “Labor in Vain” somewhere near Nashville, Tennessee? You might be forgiven for thinking so. The Robert Hicks whose essay appears below is also a best-selling novelist (The Widow of the South, A Separate Country, and the forthcoming The Orphan Mother); a former music publisher and artist manager for a range of genres, from country to alt rock; a maker of award-winning, hair-raising small batch bourbon; a preservationist whose focus is on Civil War sites, including the battlefield at Franklin, Tennessee; and a collector of southern material culture with a unique sense of what collecting can mean in the South. 

ARTICLE

Posted 06/17/16

Local color, global appeal

Three New Orleans museums and two community cultural institutions draw visitors from afar by keeping the focus on indigenous artistry.  

ARTICLE

Posted 06/17/16

Dennis Miller, Helen Keller, Bunker

Is it just me or is Dennis Miller Bunker's painting Wild Asters more than beautiful (Fig. 1)? The blue stream rushes under us, grasses bending in the current, and the streamside bushes spray on either bank. The natural world is so near, we can hear and smell it-the trill of the water and the scent of the asters and grass and even of the sun.

ARTICLE

Posted 06/14/16

Bringing back Olana

The fiftieth anniversary of the rescue of Church’s exotic masterpiece  finds it and its spectacular landscape more popular than ever with lovers of art, architecture, and ecology.  

ARTICLE

Posted 06/10/16

It was never about the food

Drawn to restaurants as settings for his stylish avatars of American anomie, Edward Hopper deliberately avoided giving them anything to eat. 

ARTICLE

Posted 06/01/16

Walker Evans: early and late

The man who, more than any other, gave visual expression to American life during the Great Depression was not a painter, but a photographer who originally wanted to be a writer. As surely as Aubrey Beardsley's graphic mastery defined London in the mauve nineties, Walker Evans's stark photographs remain the most powerful and enduring images of America in its time of greatest hardship.

ARTICLE

Posted 06/01/16

V&A: The Victoria and Albert’s new look at Europe 1600–1815

In December 2015 the Victoria and Albert Museum’s European galleries were opened to the public for the first time in nearly a decade. The prime space just off the museum’s grand entrance has been completely redesigned to uncover the original 1909 architecture of Aston Webb, and more than eleven hundred objects from the museum’s remarkable collections of art and design are now on display.

NEWS &
OPINION
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Where to Go in Summer 2015: A Must-Read Guide for Artistic Summer Destinations i