Dennis Miller, Helen Keller, Bunker

Art

The solemn nothings that  fill our everyday life blossom suddenly into bright possibilities  —Helen Keller  Life is such an actual thing —Dennis Miller Bunker Fig. 1. Wild Asters by Dennis Miller Bunker (1861–1890), 1889. Signed and dated “D. M. BUNKER/1889” at lower right. Oil on canvas, 25 by 30 inches. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas.  Is it just …

Editor’s letter, November/December 2014

Nicole Anderson Opinion

In the nineteenth century there was an oft-repeated tale about the young Thomas Coleentering New York from the far reaches of rural Pennsylvania and being met with hosannasfrom the city’s artists. Like most oft-told tales this one turned fact toward myth (to beginwith, Cole had arrived from nowhere more obscure than Philadelphia), and yet it suggests somethingintriguing and durable about …

The glitter of Night Hauling: Andrew Wyeth in the 1940s

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, May/June 2012 | How do we account for the strangeness of Andrew Wyeth’s art of the 1940s? How, that is, beyond discerning the surrealist undertones, finding the magic realist affinities, or seeing that Wyeth followed in a Brandywine tradition whose oddity was firmly established by Howard Pyle-lone pirates on desolate shores; magicians and curly-shoed dwarves; Revolutionary …

American artists as they saw themselves

Editorial Staff Art

November 2009 | In The American School (Fig. 1) Matthew Pratt portrays himself seated at his easel, the sharp profile of his head silhouetted against the canvas, which bears his signature at bottom left. Holding a palette and maulstick to steady his hand, Pratt presents himself as a painter—an astonishing act of bravado as he had just arrived in England …