Your search for "Elizabeth Pochoda" returned 27 entries.

Type

Posted 09/16/16

Treasury Notes

With a boost from Broadway, the caretakers of Hamilton Grange cast new light on the charms of Alexander Hamilton's once bucolic home.

ARTICLE

Posted 09/06/16

Editor's Letter

Lately I’ve noticed that fewer and fewer of the e-mails I receive begin with a full salutation. Most notes these days open merely “Greg” or “Gregory.”  The name isn’t preceded by “Dear,” or “Greetings,” or “Hello,” not even a “Hi” or a “Hey.” Maybe the brisk efficiency of digital communication is to blame. Or perhaps it’s an effect of inequality: in tightfisted times, with each of us protecting his or her own withered patch of prosperity, unconsciously we have forgotten about simple courtesy. Whatever the reason for the change, I miss that small gesture of civility represented by the word “Dear,” which, after all, costs nothing more than a few keystrokes.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 07/21/16

End notes: Welcoming Gregory Cerio

As we say farewell to Betsy Pochoda, who moves on to her next adventures after eight years at the helm of ANTIQUES, we welcome Gregory Cerio as the new editor. 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 07/11/16

Editor's Letter

It has been something of a long goodbye, my planned departure from these pages, and yet it has taken all of five months to arrive at the right successor. Now we have—Gregory Cerio, an old friend as it happens, whom you will meet on the last page of this issue. We are all pleased. We know Greg as someone with an unyielding faith in the arts of the past and a keen sense of how to give them a lively presence today. 

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 03/08/16

Editor's Letter

The American Revolution has a hit on its hands with Hamilton, the hip-hop musical currently lighting up Broadway. “Who lives, who dies, who tells your story,” the cast sings in its sly retooling of our republic as the story of Alexander Hamilton’s rise through the imperial city of New York (“History is happening in Manhattan and we just happen/to be in the greatest city in the world...”).

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 07/30/15

Disturbers of the Peace

One sign of an important exhibition may be its ability to move us into unfamiliar territory. By that measure, as by others, the recent show at the American Folk Art Museum, When the Curtain Never Comes Down, has claimed our attention. Its twenty-seven self-taught/outsider artists are represented by both permanent works— assemblages, garments, instruments, drawings, and the like—but more significantly by their actions in movement, song, and other forms of evanescent self-display. In the current art climate it is a relief to encounter art that for the most part cannot be bought or sold. But surely we are drawn to these evangelists of the self for other, deeper reasons

ARTICLE

Posted 07/14/15

Black dolls

Margo Jefferson | Miniature trains and boats; animals and picture books; balls that bounce and tops that spin: these toys belong to non-human worlds. Dolls are the only toys made in our image, the only human-like creatures children are given dominion over

ARTICLE

Posted 04/27/15

Making friends with fraktur: Some thoughts on the exhibition Drawn with Spirit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

If you are fraktur ignorant, fraktur agnostic, or fraktur allergic, this is an exhibition that should win you over. From its opening moment where a huge curving wall enlarges a small 1834-1835 gem of Adam and Eve attributed to Samuel Gottschall, the visitor is primed for seduction

ARTICLE

Posted 04/18/14

Harmonic inventions

Cedar House brings together art and nature, East and West, reflecting the global enthusiasms of its owner, H. Peter Stern, cofounder of Storm King Art Center

ARTICLE

Posted 01/09/14

Talking past and present

5 artists, 8 curators, 2 editors at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts 

ARTICLE
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