End notes: Welcoming Gregory Cerio

Editorial Staff Opinion

As we say farewell to Betsy Pochoda, who moves on to her next adventures after eight years at the helm of ANTIQUES, we welcome Gregory Cerio as the new editor. A man of wide-ranging interests and well-chosen words, Greg is no stranger to our office, as he was the founding editor of our sister magazine MODERN and has written for …

The Schwarz Gallery

Gregory Cerio Art, Furniture & Decorative Arts

by Gregory Cerio The Private Office of George William Childs at the Philadelphia Public Ledger, Philadelphia by George Bacon Wood Jr. (1832–1910), 1877. Oil on canvas, 27 by 38 inches. Private collection; all photographs courtesy of the Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia.     Specializing in American and European paintings of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries and best known for its expertise in …

Site Source: Danish-furniture.com

Editorial Staff Exhibitions, Furniture & Decorative Arts, Magazine

Recent issues of The Magazine ANTIQUES have delved into the history and collecting of 20th-century design. The September 2008 article “The lost generation of Danish design” by Gregory Cerio is just one example. For readers interested in learning more about Denmark’s design masters the website Danish-furniture.com offers a fine introduction. The non-commercial website was launched by Dansk Møbelkunst, a Copenhagen-based gallery …

Editor’s letter, May 2009

Editorial Staff

I sometimes stop during the day here and look back at early issues of ANTIQUES. Recently I have been dipping into articles from the 1920s when a passion for rescuing our cultural past from the march of progress swept through the country. The opening of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s American Wing in 1924 was only one sign of a …

What modern was: Mid Century masters of luxury

Editorial Staff

May 2008 | Whatever is new, is bad,” Wallace Nutting wrote in 1925. A minister-turned-entrepreneur who almost single-handedly popularized the colonial revival style via the sale of period furniture reproductions, Nutting (1861–1941) was one of the most acerbic partisans in an aesthetic fight waged in the early decades of the twentieth century—a battle between modernism and tradition. In the 1920s …

American studio ceramics at mid century

Editorial Staff

March 2009 | Mourning the loss of aesthetic purity in the modern age, Susan Sontag once wrote that “[I]n a world that is well on its way to becoming one vast quarry, the collector becomes someone engaged in a pious work of salvage.”1 There are countless reasons why people become collectors. Doubtless there are many reasons that Philip E. Aarons, …

Bold, bright, and underappreciated: British furniture at mid-century

Editorial Staff

June 2008 | In the dozen or so years since a new wave of collectors and design aficionados rediscovered furnishings of the mid-twentieth century, works from many countries—France, the United States, Italy, the Scandinavian nations, Brazil—have become prized (and pricey) artifacts. But one state that fostered a large and thriving furniture design and manufacturing community in the years prior to …

Showmanship and fantasy: the designs of James Mont

Editorial Staff

July 2008 | Theworld of fine decorative arts has been populated by many colorful characters, but only one who could have stepped out of the pages of Damon Runyon or—if your tastes run to less sentimental portrayers of the criminal underworld—Mario Puzo. His name was James Mont, a.k.a. James Pess, a.k.a. Demetrios Pecintoglu—the name he was given at his birth …