Winslow Homer’s The Life Line: A Narrative of gender and modernity

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September/October 2012 | Bringing a suspenseful story of danger and heroic rescue to an audience that never seems to tire of courageous knights and fainting maidens, Winslow Homer’s The Life Line (Fig.1) has been popular since the day it was completed in 1884. Homer’s themes of human frailty, bravery, and romance in the context of the overwhelming power …

Editor’s Letter, September/October 2012

Nicole Anderson Opinion

Our country’s regional wars may be over, but in the 1960s when the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) began, they were very much alive. Southern writers for instance were still working through the story of loss while northerners remained dubious about the value of southern culture. MESDA took a different path. The idea that the South did not …

Current and coming: A Philadelphia sampler

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

THE PHILADELPHIA ANTIQUES SHOW‘s hardworking committee, on the job since 1962, this year welcomes the show’s new director Catherine Sweeney Singer. From this pairing expect a fresh take on tradition, the best of the past proffered with invigorated ideas for the present. The ga­la preview is April 25, and the show runs through April 29. Limning a portrait of a …

A Director’s Vision: The Legacy of Anne d’Harnoncourt

Editorial Staff

To celebrate the memory of its former director, Anne d’Harnoncourt, the Philadelphia Museum has arranged a special tour through its galleries, A Director’s Vision (on view through July 19), which highlights special acquisitions made throughout d’Harnoncourt’s tenure at the museum—as curator from 1982, and as director from 1982 until her sudden death in 2008. Her colleagues at the museum have …