Late bloomers: The Purple Foliage Workshop

Editorial Staff Art

The second quarter of the eighteenth cen­tury is thought of as the golden age of Chinese export porcelain, and with good reason. This is the period just following the intro­duction of the famille rose enamel, a period of innovation and experimentation when European porcelain manufacture was in its infancy and Eu­rope was crying out for the very best that the …

The (America) House that Mrs. Webb Built

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, July/August 2012 | The April 1971 issue of Craft Horizons magazine featured a short essay titled “America House 1940-1971,” a eulogy, really, written by Aileen O. Webb for America House, a retail shop she had founded thirty years earlier.1 To the average reader of Craft Horizons (also found­ed by Mrs. Webb)2 this was not such a …

Living with antiques: No velvet ropes–a collection in New Jersey

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts, Living with Antiques

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September/October 2011 | Called the last of the Georgians by the architect Robert A. M. Stern, Mott B. Schmidt dared to be unfashionable, stub­bornly designing traditional houses for town and country long after they were in favor.* Schmidt’s houses in the American Georgian manner usually relied on a restrained com­bination of red brick, dark shutters, and …

New Views at the 55th Annual Winter Antiques Show

Editorial Staff

Both exhibitors and visitors to this year’s Winter Antiques Show, held at the Park Avenue Armory from January 23 – February 1, remarked that the event seemed to have a lot of energy and sparkle despite the drastic economic downturn.  The range, quality, and price points of the seventy-five exhibitors also seem to have struck the right note. Strong early …

Superfluity & Excess: Quaker Philadelphia falls for classical splendor

Furniture & Decorative Arts

The fruits of extensive research on Benjamin Henry Latrobe’s 1808 house and furniture for William and Mary Waln begin with their impact on the aesthetic of the city itself. By the middle of the eighteenth century the “greene Country Towne” founded by William Penn in 1682 was bustling with commercial and social activity. Colonists from Europe and the British Isles …

BADA Antiques and Fine Art Fair

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Founded in 1918, the British Antique Dealers’ Association (BADA) has long been the gold standard for such organizations and may be the most difficult to gain entrance to. It has, however, recently struggled with how best to refresh itself without compromising its strict requirements for quality and ethics. On the heels of the election of Michael D. Cohen of Cohen …

Banning ivory: A nuanced approach needed

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

What began as a well-intentioned effort to halt the wanton slaughter of elephants has resulted in sweeping restrictions on the U.S. trade in elephant ivory.  As part of the Obama administration’s broader strategy to combat wildlife trafficking, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on February 11 announced new regulations prohibiting all imports, even antiques made partly or entirely of the …

John Hardman and Company: Pugin’s glasspainters

Editorial Staff

April 2009 | A human dynamo who burned himself out at the age of forty, Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin is generally acknowledged as the most influential architect, designer, and propagandist of the nineteenth-century Gothic revival in England.1 Less well known are the entrepreneurs and manufacturers without whom Pugin could not have translated his medieval dreams into reality, and who spread …