Paul Landacre’s world

Art

The brilliance of the master printmaker owed something to the patronage of Hollywood royalty but a great deal more to the dynamism of early California modernism. Fig. 1. Growing Corn by Paul Landacre (1893–1963), 1938. Wood engraving, 8 3/4 by 4 1/2 inches (image). Private collection. Fig. 2. Sapling Slim and Shadow Naked, 1928. Wood engraving, 8 by 5 7/8 …

The Whitney After All

aroseshapiro Art

Some things just aren’t meant to fit in. The Whitney Museum of American Art certainly sounds like an august institution. But it was born on a scruffy back street in Greenwich Village at a time when “bohemian” meant “disreputable,” and during its six decades uptown—most of them at Madison Avenue and Seventy-Fifth Street, in the moneyed precincts of the Upper …

Events: Exhibitions, symposiums, and lectures through December

Editorial Staff Calendar, Exhibitions

ALABAMA Montgomery Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts: “Alexander Archipenko: Dreizehn Steinzichnun­gen”; November 29 to January 18, 2015. “The Grand Tour: Prints from Rome, Florence, Venice, Paris, and London”; to November 23. “Imprint­ing the West: Manifest Destiny, Real and Imag­ined”; November 8 to January 4, 2015. ARIZONA Tucson Tucson Museum of Art: “La Vida Fantas­tica: Selections from the Latin American Folk …

Current and coming: A Philadelphia sampler

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

THE PHILADELPHIA ANTIQUES SHOW‘s hardworking committee, on the job since 1962, this year welcomes the show’s new director Catherine Sweeney Singer. From this pairing expect a fresh take on tradition, the best of the past proffered with invigorated ideas for the present. The ga­la preview is April 25, and the show runs through April 29. Limning a portrait of a …

Curiously Carved: Pictorial Sources of Scrimshaw

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, January/February 2013 | Contrary to persistent stereotypes characterizing seamen in the Age of Sail as a barbaric rabble-unruly, illiterate ruffians devoted to the pursuit of disreputable vices-nineteenth-century Yankee whalemen were characteristically literate and, as a class, avid readers. Whaling voyages were matters of two, three, or even four years’ duration, including months at sea between landfalls; …

At home in modernism: The John C. Waddell collection of American design

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Photography by John M. Hall | from The Magazine ANTIQUES, May/June 2012 | The art of today must be created today,” the designer and author Paul T. Frankl wrote in 1928. “It must express the life about us. It must reflect the main characteristics and earmarks of our own complex civilization.”1 Over the past four decades, collector John C. Waddell …

Hudson River Classics: Edgewater and Richard Hampton Jenrette

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, January/February 2012 | People don’t like hocus-pocus,” Richard Hamp­ton Jenrette tells me. A fit eighty-two, the former lion of Wall Street seems a model of sanity in an insane world. Take his views on finance: “Wall Street has been high-jacked by speculators.” Or industry: “We are foolish to have outsourced our manufacturing.” Fig. 1. Edgewater, as …

In the American Grain: Art and Capital at Crystal Bridges

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2011 | The small town of Bentonville, Arkansas, home to some 35,301 souls in the most recent census, is about to be transformed beyond recognition. Already it enjoys some modicum of renown as the ancestral abode of the Walton fam­ily: its late patriarch, Sam Walton, founder of Walmart, opened his first five and dime here …

American genre painting and the rise of ‘average taste’

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2011 | Nearly a century and a half after its publication in 1867, Henry Theodore Tuckerman’s Book of the Artists is valued today mainly for its wealth of biographical data. But Tuckerman’s pronouncements summarizing the development of American art culture also deserve closer examination. Of particular interest is his reference to “average taste,” a descriptive …