The new collector: American bronzes

Editorial Staff Art

The Italian Renaissance taste for classical art fostered a revival of bronze statuary, wealthy connoisseurs collecting both antique statuettes and new works by artists like Donatello and Verrochio. Likewise, the nineteenth-century fascination with Renaissance art created an even larger market for bronze sculpture. Post-Civil War American sculptors, many European-trained, followed suit. Cupid by Frederick William MacMonnies (1863-1937), 1895, balances gracefully on a …

A monument to Antoine Louis Barye

Editorial Staff Magazine

From The Magazine ANTIQUES, October 2006 In June 18, 1894, a crowd gathered in the small park on the southeastern tip of the Île Saint-Louis in Paris to listen to Eugène Guillaume (1822-1905) dedicate a monument (Fig. 3) to Antoine Louis Barye, the French sculptor and painter who, during the second and third quarters of the nineteenth century, had popularized …

Mourning Becomes Them: The death of children in nineteenth-century American art

Art

“In the midst of life we are in death”  These familiar words, which marched across sermons and samplers alike in the early decades of the American republic, surely resonated with sixteen-year-old Charlotte Sheldon in the summer of 1796. Sheldon was studying at Sarah Pierce’s Litchfield Female Academy when she heard the news: Polly Buel, another student, had died. Sheldon put down her studies …

Pictures within pictures: Photographs of American folk paintings, 1840-1880

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September/October 2013. Early photographs of Ameri­can folk paintings constitute a unique archive of works by both recognized and unknown artists,1 frequently even preserving a visual record of otherwise unknown paintings. A large number of early daguerreotypists practiced this lucra­tive work at a time when photography afforded Americans their first opportunity to have accurate copies of works …

Collecting American samplers in Southern California

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, May/June 2013 | Best known for its expansive sandy beaches, stately palms, and glorious golden sunsets-as well as numerous superb collections of modern and contemporary art-Los Angeles is, perhaps unexpectedly, also home to a significant number of important and excitingly diverse American decorative arts collec­tions. While some Southern California collectors have been amassing important holdings of …

American folk painting, The Wiltshire collection

aroseshapiro Art

By RICHARD WOODWARD; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September 1978. Paintings by America’s first artists afford an informative and entertaining view of the nation’s early years. Many of these painters received academic instruction at home or abroad, while others were either wholly untutored or obtained their training from nonacademic sources. The work of this latter group, the “folk painters,” provides an insight into …

MESDA and the Study of Early Southern Decorative Arts

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

It has become almost a folk legend among decorative arts scholars: the story of Joseph Downs (1895 – 1954), then curator of the American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, announcing at the 1949 Williamsburg Antiques Forum that “little of artistic merit was made south of Baltimore.”1 The comment prompted an offended woman from Kentucky …

Hudson River Classics: Edgewater and Richard Hampton Jenrette

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, January/February 2012 | People don’t like hocus-pocus,” Richard Hamp­ton Jenrette tells me. A fit eighty-two, the former lion of Wall Street seems a model of sanity in an insane world. Take his views on finance: “Wall Street has been high-jacked by speculators.” Or industry: “We are foolish to have outsourced our manufacturing.” Fig. 1. Edgewater, as …

American genre painting and the rise of ‘average taste’

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2011 | Nearly a century and a half after its publication in 1867, Henry Theodore Tuckerman’s Book of the Artists is valued today mainly for its wealth of biographical data. But Tuckerman’s pronouncements summarizing the development of American art culture also deserve closer examination. Of particular interest is his reference to “average taste,” a descriptive …

Libraries and the preservation of early photography

Editorial Staff Art

Fig. 1. Interior of the Free Library, Melbourne, Australia by Barnett Johnson (later Johnstone; 1832–1910), 1859. Albumen print from a collodion on glass negative, 6 ½ by 7 3⁄16 inches. Fig. 2. The Hippopotamus at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, London by Don Juan Carlos, Count of Montizón (1822–1887), 1852. Salted-paper print from a collodion on glass negative, 4 ⅜ …