Your search for "james gardner" returned 32 entries.

Type

Posted 05/18/16

Walker Evans: early and late

The man who, more than any other, gave visual expression to American life during the Great Depression was not a painter, but a photographer who originally wanted to be a writer. As surely as Aubrey Beardsley’s graphic mastery defined London in the mauve nineties, Walker Evans’s stark photographs remain the most powerful and enduring images of America in its time of greatest hardship. 

ARTICLE

Posted 03/22/16

A divine passion

Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun was the most sought-after portraitist of the ancien régime. A retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art rightly calls attention to her extraordinary talent rather than her gender.  

ARTICLE

Posted 03/08/16

Editor's Letter

The American Revolution has a hit on its hands with Hamilton, the hip-hop musical currently lighting up Broadway. “Who lives, who dies, who tells your story,” the cast sings in its sly retooling of our republic as the story of Alexander Hamilton’s rise through the imperial city of New York (“History is happening in Manhattan and we just happen/to be in the greatest city in the world...”).

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 12/18/15

A Rich and Beautiful Sadness

In one of his most famous works, the esteemed art historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner sought to define “The Englishness of English Art.” If anyone were to under take a comparable inquiry into the Danishness of Danish art, the painter Vilhelm Hammershøi could well stand as the palmary embodiment of the thing in question. His small, reticent, manically controlled paintings achieve that prim order, that almost morbid inwardness, that foreigners, at least, are apt to associate with the land of Hamlet and Kierkegaard.

ARTICLE

Posted 10/14/15

Editor's letter, September/October 2015

One afternoon not long after I began working here I opened a letter that asked me a challenging question: how, the writer wanted to know, “did a Polack [sic] like you get your position?” After a few jolly moments in the office I called our longtime editor Wendell Garrett, who enjoyed odd news from the passing scene. Wendell was amused, but he also reminded me that the magazine had been founded in the 1920s, the banner era of American xenophobia, and he reckoned some of that lingered in a few of its readers.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 09/24/15

One Off

"There has never been another artist like George Caleb Bingham"

ARTICLE

Posted 02/09/15

Habsburg flash and filigree

The splendor of the house of Habsburg was always inversely proportionate to its prowess on the field of battle. Under Maximilian I of Austria and his grandson Charles V of Spain, the dynasty waged continuous battles from Cuzco to Constantinople and from Scandinavia to the shores of Africa

ARTICLE

Posted 01/12/15

Editor's letter, January/February 2015

When he was designing the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth the great American architect Louis Kahn said that he wanted it to resemble “a friendly home.” That might surprise anyone familiar with Kahn’s museums

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 03/31/14

Visions and revisions of Paris

The photographs of Charles Marville were equal to the task of capturing the painful and exhilarating creation of the first great modern city

ARTICLE

Posted 01/23/14

The unfashionable delights of Raoul Dufy

The joy Dufy depicts is at once vitally contemporary and infinitely ancient and that paradox is played out in the formal terms of his art

ARTICLE
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Where to Go in Summer 2015: A Must-Read Guide for Artistic Summer Destinations i