Your search for "james gardner" returned 35 entries.

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Posted 11/29/16

Dealers' Choice: The noteworthy art collection of gallerists Abbot and Marcia Vose of Boston goes on display

The term "old school" could almost have been invented to describe the Vose Galleries, that venerable Boston art institution now celebrating its 175th year in business. In honor of that almost unprecedented milestone for an art gallery, the two owners, Abbot "Bill" and Marcia Vose, who have been married for forty-four years, have decided to put on display a selection of their private collection of American impressionists, assembled over the past four decades, as part of an exhibition titled Crosscurrents: The Colonies, Clubs & Schools That Established Impressionism in America.

ARTICLE

Posted 11/16/16

An old master, newly arrived: Valentin de Boulogne at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

A rather depressing article appeared recently in the New York Times concerning a steep and sudden decline in the market for old master paintings. "At a time when contemporary art is all the rage among collectors, viewers, and donors," Robin Pogrebin wrote, "many experts are questioning whether old master artwork—once the most coveted—can stay relevant at auction houses, galleries, and museums." There can be a no more thunderous rebuttal to the notion that old masters are irrelevant than the new exhibition of Valentin de Boulogne at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

ARTICLE

Posted 09/23/16

That was another country

Precisely because photography is thought to be the most objective of all mediums, it acquires over the course of years, and seemingly in spite of itself, a haunted quality that no other product of visual culture can claim to the same degree.

ARTICLE

Posted 06/01/16

Walker Evans: early and late

The man who, more than any other, gave visual expression to American life during the Great Depression was not a painter, but a photographer who originally wanted to be a writer. As surely as Aubrey Beardsley's graphic mastery defined London in the mauve nineties, Walker Evans's stark photographs remain the most powerful and enduring images of America in its time of greatest hardship.

ARTICLE

Posted 03/22/16

A divine passion

Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun was the most sought-after portraitist of the ancien régime. A retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art rightly calls attention to her extraordinary talent rather than her gender.  

ARTICLE

Posted 03/08/16

Editor's Letter

The American Revolution has a hit on its hands with Hamilton, the hip-hop musical currently lighting up Broadway. “Who lives, who dies, who tells your story,” the cast sings in its sly retooling of our republic as the story of Alexander Hamilton’s rise through the imperial city of New York (“History is happening in Manhattan and we just happen/to be in the greatest city in the world...”).

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 12/18/15

A Rich and Beautiful Sadness

In one of his most famous works, the esteemed art historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner sought to define “The Englishness of English Art.” If anyone were to under take a comparable inquiry into the Danishness of Danish art, the painter Vilhelm Hammershøi could well stand as the palmary embodiment of the thing in question. His small, reticent, manically controlled paintings achieve that prim order, that almost morbid inwardness, that foreigners, at least, are apt to associate with the land of Hamlet and Kierkegaard.

ARTICLE

Posted 10/14/15

Editor's letter, September/October 2015

One afternoon not long after I began working here I opened a letter that asked me a challenging question: how, the writer wanted to know, “did a Polack [sic] like you get your position?” After a few jolly moments in the office I called our longtime editor Wendell Garrett, who enjoyed odd news from the passing scene. Wendell was amused, but he also reminded me that the magazine had been founded in the 1920s, the banner era of American xenophobia, and he reckoned some of that lingered in a few of its readers.

NEWS &
OPINION

Posted 09/24/15

One Off

"There has never been another artist like George Caleb Bingham"

ARTICLE

Posted 02/09/15

Habsburg flash and filigree

The splendor of the house of Habsburg was always inversely proportionate to its prowess on the field of battle. Under Maximilian I of Austria and his grandson Charles V of Spain, the dynasty waged continuous battles from Cuzco to Constantinople and from Scandinavia to the shores of Africa

ARTICLE
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