For the love of architecture

Editorial Staff Opinion

Call it cultural vandalism: The case against the Museum of Modern Art’s plan to raze the former building of the American Folk Art Museum designed by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien and completed in 2001. “Tod Williams and Billie Tsien’s new American Folk Art Museum…is not only New York’s greatest museum since Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim was completed in 1959, …

Saving the Ark: Chicago’s grand synagogue Agudas Achim

Editorial Staff Magazine

Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood is tucked between the high-end shops of Michigan Avenue and the outskirts of suburban Evanston. In the early twentieth century large numbers of Austro-Hungarian Jewish immigrants settled there, until new roads and growing incomes pulled them away from the city in the years after World War II. They left behind the apartments, stores, and synagogues their parents …

Great Estates: Fenway Court, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Fenway Court, the former home of Isabella Stewart Gardner, gives added meaning to the notion of a house museum.  Built in the style of a fifteenth-century Venetian palace, it was conceived as both a residence and a museum.  With the help of many great advisers, Gardner amassed-and later, meticulously arranged-a superlative collection of fine and decorative arts, architecture, and rare …

Eyre Hall on Virginia’s Eastern Shore

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

September 2009 | Photography by Langdon Clay | “Eyre Hall…all through its venerable existence but another name for everything elegant, graceful and delightful in Old Virginia life.” Fanny Fielding’s nostalgic reminiscence of Eyre Hall during the ownership of John Eyre depicts a place we would recognize today.1 Still to be found are “the timely-clipped hedges of box and dwarf-cedar,” “the …

Great Estates: Homewood Museum in Baltimore, Maryland

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Homewood Museum, a National Historic Landmark on the campus of John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, is one of the country’s finest Federal period houses. Based on a Palladian five part plan, it was built beginning in the summer of 1800, when Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and one of the wealthiest men in …

Greene and Greene at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

While we wait for the fall exhibition season to begin, now is a good time to catch the  traveling exhibition A “New and Native” Beauty: The Art and Craft of Greene & Greene, which is in its final weeks at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (through October 18). Organized by the Gamble House and the Huntington Library to mark …

Maynard Parker’s modern architecture & interior photography

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

The Huntington Library recently launched a new online database that makes accessible the archives of Los Angeles-based architectural and garden photographer Maynard L. Parker (1901-1976). Parker contributed images to many of the nation’s premiere home design publications from the late 1930s through the early 1970s including House Beautiful, Architectural Digest, Better Homes & Gardens, and Sunset. He traveled across the …

From the Spoon to the City: An architect’s perspective

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s latest exhibition From the Spoon to the City: Design by Architects from LACMA’s Collection highlights great design from the 20th century and explores architects’ passion for designing both buildings and their contents.  It includes objects by Frank Lloyd Wright, Marcel Breuer, Rudolph Schindler, Richard Neutra, Michael Graves, and Frank Gehry. The slideshow below …

Great Estates: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona

Editorial Staff

“Living in the desert is the spiritual cathartic a great many people need.  I am one of them.” -FLW This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the iconic Fifth Avenue building designed by seminal architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The museum’s golden anniversary has inspired a year-long series of events beginning with the exhibition Frank Lloyd …

Testing the fate of Admiral’s Row

Editorial Staff

Quarters C, the second-oldest residence on Admiral’s Row—the compound built between 1853 and 1901 to house the officers of the former Brooklyn Navy Yard—collapsed almost entirely on June 18.  Although the building had previously suffered irreversible damage from fire, recent heavy rains felled a fatal blow, causing the walls to give way, leaving little but the facade intact.  Given this …