How the West was seen

Editorial Staff Art, Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2013 | The Last of the Buffalo by Albert Bierstadt, c. 1888. Signed “AB[conjoined]ierstadt” at lower right. Oil on canvas, 60 ¼ by 96 ½ inches. The challenge of Go West!: Art of the American Frontier is to present us with a century (1830-1930) of familiar and unfamiliar images and to help us see them …

All About Eats: Art and the American Imagination in Chicago

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2013 | Fig. 7. Melons and Morning Glories by Peale, 1813. Inscribed “Raphaelle Peale Painted/Philadelphia Septr. 3d. 1813” at lower right. Oil on canvas, 20 ¾ by 25 ¾ inches. Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of Paul Mellon. Not so long ago you could learn how to cook an opossum by consulting The Joy of Cooking. …

The Lunder Collection is unveiled at the Colby College Museum of Art

Editorial Staff Art

On July 13, the Colby College Museum of Art in Waterville, Maine, reopens, unveiling its nationally-acclaimed collection of more than 8,000 works of art. The addition of the Alfond-Lunder Family Pavilion, a sparkling glass structure designed by Frederick Fisher and Partners Architects, on the quintessential New England college campus, will display the impressive inaugural exhibition, The Lunder Collection: A Gift …

A long time gone: Art, the Kennedy years, and the Hotel Texas

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, May/June 2013 | On the eve of President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy’s visit to Dallas in 1963 a group of Fort Worth collectors gathered sixteen mas­terworks of European and American art and installed them in the presidential suite in the Hotel Texas. Fifty years later their gesture is bound to strike us as astonishing, improbable, …

Editor’s letter, May/June 2013

Nicole Anderson Opinion

Our cover shows an early and uncharacteristically jaunty paint­ing by George Ault, part of the Lunder Collection featured in the article about the Colby College Museum of Art. Elsewhere in the issue an example of Ault’s later, more hard-boiled style can be seen in Marica and Jan Vilcek’s collection of  early American modern­ism. Ault was by most accounts an impossible …

American folk painting, The Wiltshire collection

aroseshapiro Art

By RICHARD WOODWARD; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September 1978. Paintings by America’s first artists afford an informative and entertaining view of the nation’s early years. Many of these painters received academic instruction at home or abroad, while others were either wholly untutored or obtained their training from nonacademic sources. The work of this latter group, the “folk painters,” provides an insight into …

Rediscovering an art star

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, March/April 2013 | In recent decades, few provinces of human creativity have fallen into swifter or more thorough disrepute than the society portrait. So steeply have its fortunes declined that the latest generation might be surprised to learn that this genre once held a position of signal honor among the varied forms of painting. Indeed, a …

Philadelphia collects: The torch bearer

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, March/April 2013 | This issue celebrates the long history of Philadelphia as the city of great artist-artisans. That history would be even more impressive had there been a Helen Drutt on the scene in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to make sure that absolutely nothing of value was lost to posterity. What Drutt has done for …

The Lanford Wilson collection of self-taught art

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 | It was meant to be a souvenir. It became a passion. Lanford Wilson (Fig. 4), the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright of Burn This!, Talley’s Folly, and Fifth of July was in Natchitoches, Louisiana, in the late 1980s, watching the filming of Steel Magnolias (1989). Adapted from a successful play by native son Robert Harling, the …

Creating the West in art

Editorial Staff

July 2009 | For about two generations now, a group of American museums has been exploring the nature and significance of western art. It was exactly fifty years ago, in the dusty but prim and busy town of Cody, Wyoming, near Yellowstone National Park, that the Whitney Gallery of Western Art (sister institution to New York’s Whitney Museum of American …