Glittering competition: the rivals of Faberge

Editorial Staff Art

To many collectors of nineteenth-century silver and objets de vertu, imperial Russia is the fount of Europe’s most exotic work. And even for those who can only dream of its legacy de luxe, mention of Mother Russia immediately triggers thoughts of one name, Fabergé. Coffeepot marked by Antip Ivanovich Kuzmichev (active c. 1856-1900), Moscow, c. 1890. Stamped “Made for Tiffany …

This Week’s Top Lots: April 19 – 24

Editorial Staff

*  At the April 19 American furniture, decorative art & folk art sale at Freeman’s in Philadelphia, the top lot was a pewter sweetmeat dish attributed to Francis Bassett I, 1728, that sold for $85,000 (estimate $45,000-55,000). The second highest price paid was for a George Washington memorial needlework (estimate $30,000-50,000), which sold for $33,400. *  At Freeman’s April 20 …

Fabergé at home and abroad

Editorial Staff

In a recent interview Alexander Ivanov, the prominent Russian businessman, discussed his decision to open the world’s first Fabergé museum not in Russia, as he had originally planned, but in the German resort town of Baden-Baden. Ivanov, who in 2007 paid the world record price of $17.7 million for a Fabergé egg made for the engagement of Baron Edouard de …

Whither Londongrad?

Editorial Staff

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London celebrates Magnificence of the Tsars with a sumptuous display of men’s ceremonial attire from the Russian imperial court on loan from the Moscow Kremlin Museums’ collections. What could be more fitting in the British capital that is currently nicknamed Londongrad or Moscow-on-the Thames for its several hundred thousand Russian émigrés and its dominant …