Editor’s letter, August 2009

Editorial Staff

We have grouped a promiscuous array of things in this issue under the broad umbrella of “folk art”: schoolgirl drawings, trench art, manufactured advertising signs, as well as objects more conventionally agreed upon as “folky,” such as carved walking sticks and weather vanes. While it is common to worry about the vagueness of the term folk art, I am inclined …

Endnotes: African American schoolgirl embroidery

Editorial Staff

“Amy is a treasure,” Linda Eaton, curator of textiles at the Winterthur Museum in Delaware, said to me referring to Amy Finkel, the Philadelphia needlework dealer, who recently brought a rare Berlin work picture stitched by a black American schoolgirl to her attention. Knowing that Eaton has long felt that Winterthur’s collection does not adequately represent the cultural diversity that …

The New Americana

Editorial Staff

  Now in its eighth year, the American Antiques Show, a major fundraiser for the American Folk Art Museum, remains a highlight of Americana Week in New York. The forty-seven dealers who set up in the Metropolitan Pavilion January 22-25 exhibited some of the finest examples of American folk and outsider art from the 17th to the 20th centuries.   …