Beatrix Potter, scientific illustrator

aroseshapiro Art

By Robert McCracken Peck Originally published in June 1996 At a time when many house museums have difficulty keeping their doors open, a small cottage in the English Lake District can barely manage to close its doors at all.  Hill top (Pl. VII), the two-hundred-acre farm where Beatrix Potter lived for the last thirty-eight years of her life, is so …

Stephen and Maxfield Parrish in New Hamsphire

aroseshapiro Magazine

Originally publsihed in June 1979 By Virginia Reed Colby Stephen Parrish, a well-known painter and etcher, and his son Maxfield,1 one of the most popular artists of the early twentieth century, both moved to New Hampshire in the 1890s. Stephen came to Cornish in 1893, following the sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and other artists, writers, and musicians who made up what …

Valentine’s Day by the numbers

Editorial Staff Magazine

We have published 92 February covers since 1922, and at least fourteen of them contain allusions to Valentine’s Day.   Some figures 8:  Love birds (four pairs) 1934, 1954, 1956, 1960 7:  Courting couples  1930, 1937, 1953, 1961, 1968, 1994, 2002 6:  The number of times Valentine’s Day graced the cover between 1951 and 1961. (The 1930s had four such …

Parisian jewelry and American patrons, real and fictional

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By SHIRLEY BURY; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, April 1992. The formidable skill of Parisian jewelers in interpreting the work of innovative designers was the prime cause of their international popularity. Although craftsmen elsewhere practiced the late eighteenth-century technique of open-backed, or à jour, setting, which allowed light to refract and reflect through the stones, greatly enhancing their brilliance, the contrast …

The jewelry of René Lalique

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By GEOFFREY C. MUNN; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, June 1987. Even if the word genius was used as sparingly as it should be, the late nineteenth- and early twentieth century jeweler René Lalique would always be so described. Rather than a craftsman with a leaning toward the artistic, he was an accomplished artist who chose to express himself primarily in …

Early Pittsburgh Glass-Houses

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By Harry Hall White; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November 1926.   Much interest centers about the O’ Hara Glass Works of Pittsburgh, in that this was the first of the pioneer glass-houses in the Allegheny region that endured during a period of more than eighty years in the same location. For our information regarding the establishment of these works we are entirely …

Reverie on a pair of Japanese screens

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  By Michael R. Cunningham; from the Magazine ANTIQUES, July 2001 The idea of landscape in the West has historically been aligned with geography. The appearance of a given earthbound place in a painting or photograph normally initiates for the Western viewer an immediate response of physical orientation. We wish to understand the particular environmental conditions and perhaps the terrain …

Bringing an Old house back to life

aroseshapiro Furniture & Decorative Arts

By MARGARET NOWELL; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, February 1945. There are few more worth-while experiences than bringing back to life an old house. This is what Mr. and Mrs. John Howard Joynt have done with the handsome brick house at 601 Duke Street in Alexandria, Virginia. Fig. 1-The house, with its gray brick wall, encloses two sides of the property, and overlooks …

Painters of the Hudson River school

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By FREDERICK A. SWEET; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, March 1945. Toward the end of the nineteenth century America’s art collectors were captivated by French taste and filled their gilt drawing rooms with salon figure pieces and bucolic scenes by members of the Barbizon school. Our own painters such as George Inness and Homer Martin, had to follow French trends, in order to …

SARAH GOODRIDGE

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By AGNES M. DODS; from The Magazine ANTIQUES, May 1947. THE WORK OF SARAH GOODRIDGE, one of the lesser known miniature painters of New England, has been increasing steadily in popularity for some years. Although her claim to fame rests mainly on her miniature of Gilbert Stuart, a diligent search of the countryside has brought to light many excellent likenesses from …