Glackens and Whistler: A young man’s attraction

Editorial Staff Art

When citing the formative influences on the American artist William Glackens, we tend to round up the usual suspects: Diego Velázquez, Frans Hals, Édouard Manet, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir. It is true that all of these painters, as well as Edgar Degas, Théophile Steinlen, Claude Monet, and Henri Matisse, evoked Glackens’s admiration, and he firmly believed that Americans who wished to …

The unfashionable delights of Raoul Dufy

Editorial Staff Art

Raoul Dufy is a conspicuous example of a painter who has fallen almost com­pletely from grace. He has not been the subject of a major American exhibi­tion in over a generation, and his name, it seems, is rarely mentioned any more among the living. Indeed, there is no particular reason to write this article just now, since there is unlikely …

How the West was seen

Editorial Staff Art, Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2013 | The Last of the Buffalo by Albert Bierstadt, c. 1888. Signed “AB[conjoined]ierstadt” at lower right. Oil on canvas, 60 ¼ by 96 ½ inches. The challenge of Go West!: Art of the American Frontier is to present us with a century (1830-1930) of familiar and unfamiliar images and to help us see them …

West and Copley in Houston

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

 Watson and the Shark by John Singleton Copley (1738–1815), 1778. Oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ferdinand Lammot Belin Fund. An adventurous exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston should alter our views on the influence of ear­ly American painting and painters. American Adversaries: West and Copley in a Transatlantic World explores the way in which two colonial painters …