Openings and Closings: January 6 to January 12

Elizabeth Lanza Exhibitions

Silence is Golden by Kerry James Marshall (b. 1955), 1986. Studio Museum, Harlem, New York; photograph by Marc Bernier, courtesy of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City, Utah

Kicking off the New Year, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts will introduce an exhibition on January 23 entitled Black Refractions: Highlights from the Studio Museum in Harlem. This exhibition is comprised of one hundred works by some eighty artists from the past century, whose work in many instances is underknown and underappreciated. Black Refractions seeks to correct that perception, and the UMFA is one of six venues nationwide to host this exhibition. In order to see Black Refractions in person, make sure to check here in order to plan your trip in advance.

Calla Lily Vendor by Diego Rivera (1886–1957), 1943. Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado.

Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado

The new year always brings with it a series of openings and closings, pardon the pun, at our favorite museums. This year prepare to bid adieu to Denver Art Museum’s exhibition: Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism. This exhibition explores the Mexican modernist movement in more than 150 works by artists including Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Carlos Mérida. As titular components of the exhibition, there will be 13 works by Rivera and more than 20 works by Kahlo, all emblematic of the role that artists play in shaping a national identity. In order to plan your trip in advance, make sure to check here in order to book your ticket online.

Poppy Field (Landscape at Giverny) by Willard Metcalf (1858–1925), 1886. Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee; courtesy of J. Jeffrey and Ann Marie Fox.

Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee

This year, the Dixon Gallery and Gardens is opening an exhibition entitled America’s Impressionism: Echoes of a Revolution on January 23. The art movement was late to arrive in the United States, and American Impressionism took on a unique form, precisely what this exhibition examines. Featuring more than fifty paintings, the exhibition puts American Impressionism into conversation with its predecessor as well as its descendants to help museumgoers see how the genre impacted the development of American art. As you’re making your way over to the museum, make sure that you check here in order to plan your trip beforehand.

Fruit Packing Sheds, ed. 48 by Lockwood Dennis (1937–2012), 1996. Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University, Salem, Oregon; photograph by Dale Peterson, courtesy of the Lockwood Dennis Family.

Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University, Salem, Oregon

In just a few days, the Hallie Ford Museum of Art will say goodbye to their exhibition Lockwood Dennis: Woodcuts. The exhibition showcases the work of the Washington artist with 36 woodcut prints that trace Dennis’s travels through the western United States. While making plans to experience the nostalgic exhibition, check here to plan your trip ahead of time.

Untitled by Mark Rothko (1903–1970), 1951. Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah, New York; © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko.

Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah, New York

At the end of a year that required plenty of self-reflection, the Katonah Museum of Art has the perfect exhibition. The show Rothko features only a single painting Untitled, presented in a quiet room meant for contemplation, just the sort of environment in which Mark Rothko hoped his art would be seen. This is the first in a series of exhibitions that presents Rothko pieces in the room, and this solo viewing experience is a must-see. Make sure that you check here to plan your trip.