The ‘It’ Chair, a Postscript

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

If we needed more proof that the “loop” chair (featured in the January issue) is having another moment in the sun, then the cover of the March 2009 issue of Traditional Home, which features three contemporary reproductions around a dining table, certainly helped drive our point home. While we can’t quite claim credit for that, our “biography” of the eighteenth-century …

Gilbert Rohde: The man who saved Herman Miller

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

December 2008 | Instances of fakery and shady dealing aside, furniture is rarely if ever the object of ethical quandaries. But Dirk Jan (known as D. J.) De Pree (1891-1990), the founder of the Herman Miller Furniture Company, tended to view most aspects of life through the prism of his devoutly held religious convictions, and in the summer of 1930, …

Dealer Profile: Clinton Howell

Furniture & Decorative Arts

Blogs, it is sometimes alleged, trace their ancestry back to the early 1700s, to the brawling, gossipy, partisan broadsheet newspapers that spread-virally, you might say-through Britain’s newfangled coffeehouses. Anyone trying to prove the link by means of a few strands of common DNA might look into a four-year-old blog by Clinton Howell, the American dealer in English furniture of the …

Editorial

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

An American mechanic does not exercise his trade as he has learned it: he is constantly making improvements, studying out new and ingenious processes either to perfect his work or to reduce its price, and is, in most cases, able to account for the various processes of his art in a manner which would do credit to a philosopher. —Francis …

Museum Accessions: A Wedgwood Revival

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

The mantelpiece featured here is one of twelve designed for a large neoclassical Georgian house on the estate of Buckminster Park in Grantham, Leicestershire, one of the family seats of William Tollemache, ninth Earl of Dysart. In 1881 or 1882 the young Lord Dysart commissioned the architect Halsey Ricardo to completely remodel and redecorate the house. Both an interior and …

The New Americana

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

  Now in its eighth year, the American Antiques Show, a major fundraiser for the American Folk Art Museum, remains a highlight of Americana Week in New York. The forty-seven dealers who set up in the Metropolitan Pavilion January 22-25 exhibited some of the finest examples of American folk and outsider art from the 17th to the 20th centuries.   …

Skinner, Inc. to Go Live

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Signaling the expanding presence of regional and specialty auction houses on the web, Skinner, Inc. recently announced that it would bring its auctions online in spring 2009.   Skinner-Live!, a live online bidding applet, will make it possible for bidders to compete in Skinner auctions in real time from the company’s own website.  While other auction houses have partnered with …

Royal porcelain from the Twinight Collection

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

September 2008 | Spotting a few plates from the Vienna porcelain manufactory in an antiques shop in the Camden Passage, London, in 1994 was the beginning of it all. Today, Richard Baron Cohen’s Twinight Collection is the largest assemblage in private hands of early nineteenth-century porcelain from the royal manufactories at Sèvres, Berlin, and Vienna, rivaled only, perhaps, by museum …

Queries: Irish Furniture

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Information about and photographs of labeled or stamped nineteenth-century Irish furniture is being sought for publication in a companion volume to a new survey of Irish cabinetmakers. The author wishes to illustrate a wide variety of furniture by Irish cabinetmakers including Eggleso, Kirchoffer, Murray, Gillington, Strahan, Jones, Scott, and Pasley, and carvers Kearney, Del Vecchio, and De Groot. Examples of …

The lost generation of Danish design

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

September 2008 | Nothing is harder to lose than a bad reputation, as a group of long-overlooked Danish furniture designers would probably agree. The furnishings and housewares that emerged from twentieth-century Scandinavia—particularly out of Denmark—had an enormous impact on modernist design. Whether working with fine rosewood or humbler materials such as bent plywood, Scandinavians had an unmatched talent for marrying …