Current & Coming | By Archived articles

V&A: The Victoria and Albert’s new look at Europe 1600–1815

June 1, 2016  |  By Joan DeJean

Neptune and Triton  by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, c. 1622– 1623, as installed in the newly reopened Europe 1600–1815 galleries at the V&A. Except as noted, all images © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

 

 

 

In December 2015 the Victoria and Albert Museum’s European galleries were opened to the public for the first time in nearly a decade. The prime space just off the museum’s grand entrance has been completely redesigned to uncover the original 1909 architecture of Aston Webb, and more than eleven hundred objects from the museum’s remarkable collections of art and design are now on display. Visitors descend stairs and immediately experience the power of the Italian baroque: Bernini’s monumental sculpture Neptune and Triton of about 1622–1623 dominates the first gallery.

The central rooms of the galleries known as Europe 1600–1815 introduce periods and styles in chronological order: the baroque with rich purple walls, pistachio green for the rococo, and …» More

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Current & Coming | By Elizabeth Pochoda

The Yale Center for British Art Reopens

May 11, 2016  |  

The Library Court of the Yale Center for British Art, following its recent reinstallation. Photograph by Richard Caspole.  

 

Traditional architecture can age gracefully but nothing is more dispiriting than modernism gone to seed. That may be especially true of Louis Kahn’s work because Kahn hid nothing; it was part of his bravery, and his ethics, to put every trick and technique on view, exposing it all with as much light as his walls could contain. If you revere his architecture as I do, you want the fit and finish of his final building, the Yale Center for British Art, which reopens on May 11 after an elaborate conservation project, to live up to the architect’s exceptional honesty by giving you his bravery unfiltered, undiluted, and with all of the serene thrills of 1977. And so it has.

 

Louis Kahn standing in front of the Yale Center for British Art under construction, in a photograph taken in February 1973. Yale Center for British Art, Institutional Archives.  

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Current & Coming | By Eleanor H. Gustafson

End Notes: Happy to be here, our new home near Madison Square Park

February 10, 2016  |  Last October The Magazine ANTIQUES and our sister publications MODERN and Art in America joined forces with the venerable ARTnews. In November we moved from SoHo, our longtime home, to new offices just down from Madison Square Park and within sight of the Flatiron Building, built in 1902, the year ARTnews began publication.

By Eleanor H. Gustafson

The Flatiron Building, designed by Daniel Burnham (1846–1912), completed 1902, in a photograph of c. 1905 by the Detroit Publishing Company. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Prints and Photographs Division.  

 

 

 

 

 

It’s a neighborhood that is currently food central for New York gastronomes and casual grazers. Bookended by the high end Eleven Madison Park on one side of the park and the mecca of Eataly on the other, there is the humble Shake Shack at the park’s core, where you can eat al fresco and look at some fine sculpture and architecture. For us this neighborhood constitutes the ideal conjunction of food and ar…» More

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Current & Coming | By Archived articles

On Books: New and Noteworthy

December 18, 2015  |  

Making It Modern: The Folk Art Collection of Elie and Viola Nadelman by Margaret K. Hofer and Roberta J. M. Olson (New-York Historical Society in association with D. Giles). 376 pp., color and b/w illus. 

There’s nowt so queer as folk,” according to the venerable English comment on the vagaries of human personality. Indeed, when the Polish-born American sculptor Elie Nadelman and his wife Viola Flannery married in 1919, the exceptional variety of objects that we now categorize as folk art were only beginning to be recognized as worthy of serious collecting in America.

Though the Nadelmans referred to their ac quisitions as “folk art” from the beginning of their collecting activities in 1920, the term itself didn’t enter widespread use until the next decade.

The Nadlemans had considerable money to spend because Viola had been left a sizeable estate by her first husband, and they started their collection by purchasing objects to furnish their houses. Among their first signif…» More

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Current & Coming | By Archived articles

Art Brut in New York

December 4, 2015  |  Although the American Folk Art Museum’s exhibition space has contracted since it moved to 2 Lincoln Square from the now-demolished Tod Williams and Billie Tsien building on West Fifty-Third Street, it continues to expand thematically. Following its recent exhibition of self-taught performance artists, When the Curtain Never Comes Down, which stretched from Japan to Brazil, the museum is now mounting Art Brut in America: The Incursion of Jean Dubuffet. The two hundred works are drawn from Dubuffet’s vast collection in the Collection de l’Art Brut in Lausanne, Switzerland. The exhibition is in some ways a reprise of a ten-year-long display of twelve hundred works from his collection that was held in the East Hampton, Long Island, home of the artist Alfonso Ossorio between 1952 and 1962. This time around the works brought here will have a public venue, and what visitors will see amounts to a staging of Dubuffet’s great moment of impact on American art and artists. That some of the…» More

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