Current & Coming | By Katy Kiick

Events: Exhibitions, symposiums, and lectures

July 3, 2014  |  Fore more, visit our calendar.

Left: Eagle by Bernard Langlais, ,ca. 1964, raw and painted wood, 96 x 48 x 3 inches, Colby College Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Bernard Langlais. Photo: Pixel Acuity.  On view at Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, Maine. July 19 to January 4, 2015.

ALABAMA

Montgomery Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts: "Origins: The First Twenty-Five Years of the MMFA Collection"; July 12 to August 31.

ARIZONA

Phoenix Phoenix ArtMuseum: "Antonio Berni: Juanito and Ramona"; to September 21.* # "William H. Johnson: An American Mod­ern"; to July 13.*

ARKANSAS

Bentonville Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art: "American Encounters: Anglo-American Portraiture in an Era of revolution"; to September 15.* # "Born of Fire: Ceramic Art in Regional Collections"; to March 2, 2015.

CALIFORNIA

Los Angeles Autry National Center: "Flo­ral Journey: Native North American Bead­work"; to April 26, 2015.* # "Route 66: The Road and the Romance"; to January 4, 2015.

J. Paul…» More

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Current & Coming | By Cynthia Drayton

The PRB at the MMA

July 1, 2014  |  Five Metropolitan Museum of Art curatorial departments comprising European paintings, drawings and prints, photographs, European decorative arts, and the Watson Library along with several private lenders have collaborated to produce a small,well-focused exhibition, The Pre-Raphaelite Legacy: British Art and Design.

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (PRB) was founded in 1848 by seven young artists and writers who rejected contemporary academic painting, and instead looked for inspiration in late medieval and early Renaissance art before Raphael; hence the name. By 1853 the group had disbanded. A brief time later artists William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones, both former Oxford theology students, asked former PRB member Dante Gabrielle Rossetti to lead a revival of the movement and to create art that also embraced romanticism, medievalism, and literature.

The Love Song by Sir Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898),  1868-77. Oil on canvas, 45 by 61 3/8 inches. The Metropolitan Museum …» More

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Current & Coming | By James Gardner

No Growing Pains at the Frick Collection

June 24, 2014  |  Recently, an ill-considered op-ed in the New York Times, written by David Masello, took issue with the Frick Collection's plans for an ambitious expansion. Yes, there is something formulaic, almost knee-jerk in the way in which, these days, every museum seems to feel that it must expand and debase itself to embrace bigger audiences. But there is something equally formulaic, almost knee-jerk, in supposing that the Frick Collection is animated by no wiser impulse than simply to follow the trend, that it is "doing" a  MoMA or a Whitney. If ever a museum were justified in expanding, it is the Frick, especially in expanding exactly as the Frick intends to do.

Mr. Masello's argument can be reduced to the fear that this expansion will destroy the sense one now has, in visiting the Frick, of entering one of the great private residences of the Gilded Age, that the expansion will ruin this effect through the introduction of stridently modern forms like those of Renzo Piano at the Morg…» More

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Current & Coming | By James Gardner

Then and Now: A museum’s museum

June 12, 2014  |  One of my earliest memories is from half a century ago and relates to something that I saw, and that astonished me, in the darkened halls of the American Museum of Natural History. I was four and my nanny was taking me-not for the first time, as I clearly recall-to the museum, a few blocks from where I grew up. On one of the upper floors, where you now see the dinosaurs, the museum displayed its gemstone and mineral collection, which was moved, about a decade later, to the ground floor. It must have been a weekday, because there was no one else in the cavernous hall. Suddenly I saw a man in a motorized wheel-chair glide by, "swifter than thought," along the terrazzo floors and disappear out a distant exit as quickly as he had come. Back then, unlike today, motorized wheelchairs were so rare that I would almost imagine they didn't exist, except that I saw one with my own eyes and have replayed the memory in my mind many times since.

Above: Mammal Hall, 1900. AMNH Digital Specia…» More

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Current & Coming | By James Gardner

Meet the Altamiras at the Met

May 22, 2014  |  Go to the Metropolitan and meet the Altamiras, one of the richest and most illustrious families of 18th Century Spain. Four of Goya's portraits of the family are assembled in one place for the first time in a century and a half. So illustrious was the family that the father, Vicente Joaquín Osorio Moscoso y Guzmán, 12th Conde de Altamira, was said to have more titles to his name than any Spaniard of his time. And though the family would ultimately lose most of its wealth in the catastrophic upheaval that followed Napoleon's invasion of Spain in 1808, at the time when Goya painted these four sitters, between 1786 and 1788, they seemed positively pink with prosperity.

Frequent visitors to the Met will already be familiar with two of these works, the Lehman Collection's pearline portrait of Maria Ignacia Álvarez de Toledo, Condesa de Altamira, holding an infant girl in her arms, and the portrait of Manuel Osorio Manrique de Zuñiga, Maria's younger son. The latter, a boy in a br…» More

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NYG 2013

by Émile Jacques Ruhlmann (1879-1933), 1926. Macassar ebony, amaranth, and ivory. Metropolitan Museum of Art. By Cynthia Drayton

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