Openings and Closings: October 7 to October 13

Elizabeth Lanza Art

Kunstdommere (Art Judeges) by Michael Ancher (1849—1927), 1906. Danish Museum of National History, Frederiksborg Castle, Hillerød, Denmark; courtesy of National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC.

National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC

The National Portrait Gallery reopened on September 18 bringing with it new exhibitions and, sadly, saying goodbye to others. Their exhibition Portraits of the World: Denmark will close on October 12. This exhibition is the third of the Portraits of the World series that NGA has curated to place American portraiture into a global context. Featuring the works of artists such as George Biddle and Peggy Bacon, this exhibition is a must see. Before you make the trip to Washington, DC, make sure to look here to plan your outing.

The Four Horsement of the Apocalypse from The Apocalypse. 1496—1498, from the Latin edition of 1511 by Albrecht Dürer (1471—1528), 1511. Private Collection; Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston, South Carolina.

Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston, South Carolina

Charleston locals and tourists alike should be thrilled to hear that the Gibbes Museum of Art has reopened. Debuting on October 9 at the Gibbes is the exhibition Charleston Collects: Devotion and Fantasy, Witchcraft and the World’s End. The exhibition comes from a private collection of Northern Renaissance artworks that highlight the mix of unease and hope that defined the era. In order to plan your trip in advance, check here to see the Gibbes’ advice and guidelines for visitors.

Twilight Confidences by Cecilia Beaux (1855—1942), 1888. Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, Georgia.

Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, Georgia

After reopening late this summer, the Georgia Museum of Art brought back several exhibitions that were forced to close down early. One of our favorites is In Dialogue: Cecilia Beaux’s “Twilight Confidences” which showcases the peculiar work of an artist whose career spanned the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In Dialogue is the first in a series of exhibitions in which the Georgia Museum of Art creates a focused and detailed conversation about one artwork from their permanent collection. In order to see the debut of this series, check here to plan your trip in advance as well as reserve your free timed tickets.

A young Frank Lloyd Wright. Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust, Chicago, Illinois; courtesy of Elmhurst Art Museum, Elmhurst, Illinois.

Elmhurst Art Museum, Elmhurst, Illinois

If you’re itching to get out of the house but still erring on the side of caution, the Elmhurst Art Museum has the perfect exhibition. Wright Before the “Lloyd” is a self-guided outdoor walking tour that features the Elmhurst architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright as well as that of Mies van der Rohe. In addition to the walking tour, the exhibition features a collection of materials that detail Wright’s early explorations as a young architect. Before going over to the Elmhurst Art Museum, make sure to check here to plan your visit in advance.

Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Indianapolis, Indiana

At the Indianapolis Museum of Art: Newfields you have just a few weeks to catch the exhibition Edward Hopper and the American Hotel, a setting that figures prominently and frequently in the artist’s work. The exhibition is comprised of 100 works by Hopper and 26 other artists, all of whom highlight the transitory and anonymous nature of the American hotel. In order to plan your trip to Newfields in advance, check here to see the museums guidelines and here to learn more about the exhibition before you go.

Boy’s Vest by Unidentified Lakota artist, late 19th century. Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland.

Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland

After reopening in stages throughout September, the Baltimore Museum of Art has unveiled some brand-new exhibitions. One of our favorites is opening this week on October 11. Stripes and Stars: Reclaiming Lakota Independence showcases nine beaded works created in the late 19th century by Lakota women that each feature the American flag. This exhibition explores the multivalent symbolic meanings that the banner had for the Lakota people. Make sure to check here to plan your trip to the Baltimore Museum of Art in advance.

Portrait of Mary de Cardonnel, Countess Talbot (1719—1787) by Nathaniel Hone (1718—1784), 1743. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Fayette, Missouri.

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Fayette, Missouri

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art reopened in September with several new exhibitions. One of our favorites is Formed from Fire: Enamel Portrait Miniatures. The exhibition highlights the collection Mr. and Mrs. John W. Starr donated to the museum in the mid 20th century. It encompasses over 250 works from the 18th century and the exhibition details the illustrious history and complex creation processes of enamel miniatures. In order to plan your visit in advance make sure to click here and don’t forget, admission is free.