Fantastic Mr. Shearer

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Fantastic Mr. Shearer A man with a mission, the elusive late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Virginia cabinetmaker John Shearer often professed his British loyalties in carving and inlay. Even when he did not, his furniture displays an idiosyncratic style that has long intrigued scholars and collectors-and made Shearer the subject of two articles in our April-May 2010 issue, written in …

The African perspective in Detroit

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

The Detroit Institute of Arts is presenting a fascinating and adventurous exhibition that explores the consequences on African art of cultural exchanges between Africa and Europe over the past five hundred years. Casting the European as the cultural “other,” a reversal of the usual Eurocentric perspective, the exhibition examines how African artists from diverse cultures used, and continue to use, …

Women and folk art and imperial silver in New York

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

So many exhibitions open in New York in any given month that it is hard to choose which ones to feature. Two that have great appeal are Women Only: Folk Art by Female Hands, at the American Folk Art Museum, and Vienna Circa 1780: An Imperial Silver Service Rediscovered, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from April 13 …

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts reopens

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

With an atrium, a forty-foot-high glass wall, new galleries, restaurant, café, and sculpture garden, the reopening of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) on May 1 is the latest in a series of important museum renovations and one of the most anticipated. The 165,000 square-foot expansion, designed by the London-based American architect Rick Mather and the Richmond firm SMBW, …

Antiques Week in Philadelphia

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Philadelphia hosts two important antiques shows in mid-April, and free shuttle service between them makes it easy to see everything on offer. The Twenty-third Street Armory Antiques Show, now in its sixteenth year, opens on Friday April 16 and features more than forty dealers showcasing eighteenth- through twentieth-century American and European fine, folk, and decorative arts. A special exhibition entitled …

Asian art in New York

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Cup, Chinese, seventeenth century. Rhinoceros horn, 5 ½ inches. Photograph courtesy of Christie’s Images. Woven basket made by Kenji Fuji, 1942–1946. Crepe paper, twine, wire, and starch. National Japanese Society, San Francisco. Photograph by Terry Heffernan for Ten Speed. Asian art in New York March 20 to 28 is Asia Week in New York, when more than thirty dealers, auction …

Eames House tour contest

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

The Delaware-based type foundry and design firm House Industries is offering three lucky individuals a chance to win an exclusive tour of the Eames House (Case Study House #8) in Pacific Palisades, California, where the dynamic design duo lived from 1949. Although the grounds of the Eames House are open to the public, tours of the interior are usually only …

Celebrating the ‘Decodence’ of the SS Normandie

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Unlike other major exhibitions of the art deco period, DecoDence: Legendary Interiors and Illustrious Travelers Aboard the SS Normandie, which opens today at the South Street Seaport Museum, isn’t an over-the-top display. Instead, it’s a balanced, and entirely engrossing, collection of furnishings, ephemera, and architectural elements that graced the legendary ocean liner. Among the show’s highlights: photographs that document the …

Grandma Moses comes home to Galerie St. Etienne

Editorial Staff Art

When the Museum of Modern Art hosted an exhibition of contemporary unknown artists in 1939 one artist to be discovered was Anna Mary Robertson Moses. Beloved as much for her sweet persona as for her winsome paintings, the self-taught folk artist from Eagle Bridge, New York, was 79 years old at the time. Luckily, for the sake of American art …

Query: Edwin Scott Bennett

Editorial Staff Art

An “artist turned photographer of artists,” Edwin Scott Bennett (1847-1915) is the subject of a forthcoming article. Edwin Scott Bennett lived and worked in New York in the late nineteenth century. Bennett initially studied landscape painting under William De Haas and figure painting under William Morgan, and then later took up photography. He took photographs of prominent American painters and …