It was never about the food

Art

Drawn to restaurants as settings for his stylish avatars of American anomie, Edward Hopper deliberately avoided giving them anything to eat.  Chop Suey by Edward Hopper (1882–1967), 1929. Oil on canvas, 32 by 38 inches. Collection of Barney A. Ebsworth; photograph courtesy of the Seattle Art Museum.  The painter Edward Hopper seemed to care a great deal about what he put …

Editor’s letter, September/October 2015

Editorial Staff Opinion

One afternoon not long after I began working here I opened a letter that asked me a challenging question: how, the writer wanted to know, “did a Polack [sic] like you get your position?” After a few jolly moments in the office I called our longtime editor Wendell Garrett, who enjoyed odd news from the passing scene. Wendell was amused, …

A major exhibition offers a fresh look at William Glackens

Editorial Staff Art

“Armenian Girl” by Glackens, 1916. Oil on canvas, 32 by 26 inches. The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia and Merion, PA. The Soda Fountain by William James Glackens (American, 1870-1938), 1935. Oil on canvas, 48 by 36 inches. Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Joseph E. Temple and Henry D. Gilpin Funds 1955. Installation view at Nova Southeastern University’s Museum of Art, Fort Luaderdale. Photograph by Steven …

Glackens and Whistler: A young man’s attraction

Editorial Staff Art

When citing the formative influences on the American artist William Glackens, we tend to round up the usual suspects: Diego Velázquez, Frans Hals, Édouard Manet, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir. It is true that all of these painters, as well as Edgar Degas, Théophile Steinlen, Claude Monet, and Henri Matisse, evoked Glackens’s admiration, and he firmly believed that Americans who wished to …

Life Studies: Edward Hopper’s drawings

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September/October 2013. The hope of the artist is to resist interpre­tation. Emerson said that “to be great is to be misunderstood” and, pressed to explain his troubles, Hamlet cried to his inter­locutors, “You would pluck out the heart of my mystery.” Among contemporary artists, Jasper Johns has made a creed of reticence, and Edward Hopper was …

Forces for the new: Collectors and the 1913 Armory Show

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, January/February 2013 | Fig. 14. Self-Portrait by van Gogh, c. 1887. Oil on canvas, 15 ¾ by 13 ⅜ inches. Wadsworth Athenaeum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut, gift of Philip L. Goodwin in memory of his mother, Josephine S. Goodwin. On February 17, 1913, the most important art event ever held in America-the International Exhibition of …

Master of delight: William J. Glackens at the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale

Editorial Staff Art

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2011 |  Fig.1. Cape Cod Pier byWilliam J. Glackens (1870-1938), 1908. Signed “W. Glackens” at lower right. Oil on canvas, 26 by 32 inches. The works illustrated are inthe Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Gift of an anonymous donor. Behind the facade of a modern white monolith shimmering in the light of the Florida sun lies …

Modern sculptors and American folk art

Editorial Staff Art

“Do not bore. Do not be obvious.” That was the advice given by painter, teacher, and critic Hamilton Easter Field (1873-1922) to his students in the Ogunquit (Maine) School of Paint­ing and Sculpture, which he opened in 1911 with his protégé, the French-born sculptor Robert Laurent.1 For Field, Laurent, and their colleagues who passed through Ogunquit and who shared similar …

Malmaison in the sky

Editorial Staff Art, Furniture & Decorative Arts

Malmaison is familiar to many as the château of the Empress Josephine in Rueil-Malmaison, eight miles west of Paris. In 1978, though, Malmaison moved to New York—figuratively speaking—in the form of Roger Prigent’s fabled Malmaison Antiques, which introduced French Empire furnishings of the highest quality to the United States. An insatiable—yet discerning—collector who refers to Josephine as “the first lady …